715th MI has tactical dining-in

| April 24, 2015 | 0 Comments
Sgt. Eunmi Kiyoshi, language analyst, Company B, 715th MI Bn., 500th MI Bde., along with other members of the color guard, render honors to the colors during the battalion’s dining-in, March 27, at Wheeler Army Airfield.

Sgt. Eunmi Kiyoshi, language analyst, Company B, 715th MI Bn., 500th MI Bde., along with other members of the color guard, render honors to the colors during the battalion’s dining-in, March 27, at Wheeler Army Airfield.

Staff Sgt. Thomas G. Collins
500th Military Intelligence Brigade Public Affairs

WHEELER ARMY AIRFIELD — The mood was relaxed and jovial as members of the 715th Military Intelligence Battalion, 500th MI Brigade, gathered, here, March 27, to honor an Army tradition steeped in history.

The dining-in is traditionally a formal dinner function for members of a military organization or unit, and it provides an occasion for unit members and their guests to gather together in an atmosphere of camaraderie, good fellowship, fun and social rapport.

“This was my first dining-in,” said Spc. Jessica M. McNamara, signals intelligence analyst, Company C. “The unit came together and I got to see the officers and senior enlisted be themselves outside of work and see them for who they are as a person.”

It is important to emphasize that a dining-in celebrates the unique bond or cohesion that has held military units together in battle.

“I think it is important to learn and understand the traditions in the Army because we are in the Army,” said McNamara. “You should know what the Army is about, how it was formed and how the traditions came about.”

Sgt. 1st Class Rena D. Wilson, security and intelligence staff NCOIC, Headquarters Operations Company, 715th MI Bn.,  lights a candle in remembrance of those who gave the ultimate sacrifice as part of the battalion’s dining-in.

Sgt. 1st Class Rena D. Wilson, security and intelligence staff NCOIC, Headquarters Operations Company, 715th MI Bn., lights a candle in remembrance of those who gave the ultimate sacrifice as part of the battalion’s dining-in.

The U.S. Military Academy at West Point guide defines a military dining-in:

 

“The custom of the ‘Dining-In’ can be traced to an old Viking tradition of celebrating their victorious battles and collective feats of heroism with a formal feasting ceremony. It is believed that this tradition later spread to England – possibly carried there with the Norman invasions. The tradition was further passed with the establishment of the Officer’s Mess in British military units. World Wars I and II brought the American and British military close together and exposed U. S. officers to this ancient tradition of the dining-in. Quickly seeing its benefits for the units, we adopted it as our own, and today cadets, officers and noncommissioned officers in the American Army regularly hold dining-ins.”

 

Traditions and the history behind them reinforce unit cohesion.

“I thought it was an excellent opportunity to build both esprit de corps and develop unit cohesion,” said Spc. Jason P. Gore, a native of Princeton, West Virginia, and a signals intelligence analyst, Co. D. “It develops personal and professional relationships with members throughout the unit.”

500th MI Dining-In

500th MI Dining-In

“At the core of this battalion is the value of trust built on relationships,” said Lt. Col. Harry D. Hung, commander, 715th MI Bn. “This evening reinforced that bond by bringing all of us together with great conversations, hilarious outtakes, memorable skits and abundant humor.”

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Category: News, Observances

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