IPC celebrates Earth Day

| April 30, 2015 | 0 Comments
Braydon Duff, 7, left, and his younger brother, Iayn Duff, 5, participate in a miniature boat race at the April 22 Earth Day celebration at the Kalakaua Community Center on Schofield Barracks. The race teaches children the basics of wind power and hydro power, both of which are sources of renewable energy.

Braydon Duff, 7, left, and his younger brother, Iayn Duff, 5, participate in a miniature boat race at the April 22 Earth Day celebration at the Kalakaua Community Center on Schofield Barracks. The race teaches children the basics of wind power and hydro power, both of which are sources of renewable energy.

Story and photo by
Karen A. Iwamoto
Staff Writer
SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — The Earth Day celebration at the Kalakaua Community Center, here, featured interactive exhibits about recycling, horticulture, renewable energy and ecology—all aimed at teaching visitors about the importance of caring for the planet.

But some of the youngest attendees already understood the importance of Earth Day. In fact, some of them were teaching their peers about how to care for the environment.

“Taking care of the earth is important because it’s where we live,” said 8-year-old William Collins, a third grader at Wheeler Elementary School. “If we don’t take care of the environment, we won’t be able to live here anymore.”

He said he does his part for the environment by volunteering at beach and park cleanups and making sure to recycle cans, bottles and paper whenever possible. His family donates the money they earn from recycling to charities.

Earth Day values
“It helps the kids understand that we need to take care of nature so nature takes care of us,” his mother, Katherine Collins, explained. “We can take actions that make a difference every day.”

Jasmine Dilworth, an 8 1/2-year-old third grader at Solomon Elementary School, also recycles, but takes it a step further by turning bottle caps into bracelets instead of just throwing them away.

B3_USAGHI_Kalakaua_Earth_Day_002_wShe and Jenna Brooks, an 8-year-old second-grader at Hale Kula Elementary School, were teaching other children at the celebration how to grow simple plants, such as sunflowers, from seed.

“You just press it in with your finger,” Brooks said, demonstrating by pressing her own finger into a miniature plant pot filled with dirt, placing the seed into the shallow indent and carefully covering it with a layer of soil. “Then add some water and give it time.”

She explained that even something as simple a planting a flower makes a difference. “Plants are homes for insects and other living things,” she said. “They help keep the air clean.”

B3_USAGHI_Kalakaua_Earth_Day_005_wLike Brooks, Collins and Dilworth, those who attended the Earth Day celebration helped to support the Army’s mission to defend the nation by protecting the environment and ensuring future environmental resiliency.

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Category: Community, Community Relations, Observances, Sustainability

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