8th MPs introduce students to career opportunities

| May 1, 2015 | 0 Comments
Alma Sanchez, a senior from James Campbell High School, is helped into a bomb suit by Soldiers of the 74th EOD Co., 728th MP Btn., 8th MP Bde., 8th TSC, during the school’s career day held at Hamilton Field, April 9 .

Alma Sanchez, a senior from James Campbell High School, is helped into a bomb suit by Soldiers of the 74th EOD Co., 728th MP Btn., 8th MP Bde., 8th TSC, during the school’s career day held at Hamilton Field, April 9 .

Story and photos by Staff Sgt. Taresha Hill
8th Military Police Brigade Public Affairs
8th Theater Sustainment Command

 

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — Members of the 520th Military Working Dog (MWD) Detachment and 74th Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Company, 8th Military Police Brigade, 8th Theater Sustainment Command, along with special agents from 102nd Det. (Criminal Investigation Detachment), 19th MP Battalion (CID), 6th MP Group, introduced 50 students to their different skill-sets during James Campbell High School’s career day, recently held on Hamilton Field, here.

The students spent the morning rotating through three different stations in small groups as MWD, EOD, and CID showcased their perspective skills, which allowed the young students to explore some of the career opportunities found within the military.

Under the guidance of a Soldier from the 74th EOD Co., students from James Campbell High School test their mechanical skills by maneuvering a robotic tool, during a career day, April 9, at Hamilton Field.

Under the guidance of a Soldier from the 74th EOD Co., students from James Campbell High School test their mechanical skills by maneuvering a robotic tool, during a career day, April 9, at Hamilton Field.

“They’ve been very receptive and have asked a lot of questions,” said Staff Sgt. Nathan Stanton, squad leader, MWD.

Stanton’s team demonstrated how fun it was to work with their K-9 partners. He also explained what incredible work and focus went into the demanding task of training the dogs.

“It’s not just playing with dogs. It’s a lot of hard work. Fun, but hard work.” Stanton stressed,

As students went from station to station, some received hands-on training. Testing their agility, students volunteered to be strapped into a bite or bomb suit, and then tried to run.

Others opted for the less strenuous and tested their mechanical skills as they maneuvered EOD’s robotic tools.

Despite CID not having bite or bomb suits, students were still able to get a glimpse into the complexity that is criminal investigations as they viewed CID’s tools and kits. The students found they could not immediately become CID special agents upon entering the military, but they learned the steps to become a special agent.

“The students love this,” said SaraAnn Kimura-Tung, JCHS’s student activities coordinator. “We’ve been doing this for a couple years now and it’s always a hit with them.”

Bite suit

Bite suit

For most of the students, it was an eye-opening experience.

“It showed the students that what they were learning in school translated into a job in the military,” said Staff Sgt. Russell Grainger, U.S. Army-Honolulu Recruiting Company. Grainer helped Kimura-Tung set up the career day.

Despite the focus on career opportunities, Grainger said it was also about making a connection and fostering a friendship between the high school and the military.

“It’s not always about putting them in boots,” he said.

 

 

 

 

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