MEDCOM goals discussed at ‘High Reliability’ summit

| May 1, 2015 | 0 Comments
Master Sgt. Anthony Elliott, Pacific Regional Medical Command Lt. Gen. Patricia Horoho, Army surgeon general,  and Maj. Brent Tuma, chief of Quality Management & Assurance Division, Hawaii Enhanced Multi-Service Market, discuss HRO concepts during the summit held at the Hale Koa,  April 23-24.

Master Sgt. Anthony Elliott, Pacific Regional Medical Command
Lt. Gen. Patricia Horoho, Army surgeon general, and Maj. Brent Tuma, chief of Quality Management & Assurance Division, Hawaii Enhanced Multi-Service Market, discuss HRO concepts during the summit held at the Hale Koa, April 23-24.

Ana Allen and Master Sgt. Anthony Elliott
Army News Service

 

HONOLULU — The Pacific Regional Medical Command held its High Reliability Organization (HRO) Summit at the Hale Koa Hotel, April 23-24.

The two-day HRO summit focused on the U.S. Army Medical Command’s goals of being the world’s leader in high reliability healthcare and creating an effective culture of safety. Command teams, key PRMC staffers and their medical partners took part in open forum discussions geared at understanding MEDCOM’s expectations when it comes to providing the safest healthcare possible. The summit marks the fifth HRO conference held across the MEDCOM and brings the percentage of key Army Medicine Leaders who are now HRO trained to 100%.

Lt. Gen. Patricia Horoho, Army Surgeon General, provided her vision for the way forward in high reliability healthcare and demonstrated Army Medicine’s desire to foster a patient safety environment which achieves zero preventable harm.

“Safety is the fabric and the culture that we want across every aspect of the provision of care. Our pursuit of zero preventable harm is something that is doable. We have been successful in every single mission that we have ever undertaken and this is just one more mission that we are pursuing,” said Horoho.

During the summit, leaders also discussed the common thread shared by the aviation and healthcare industries. Both seek to repeatedly accomplish the mission while avoiding catastrophic events, despite significant hazards, dynamic tasks, time constraints and complex technologies.

“It’s about communication, about collaboration and about a significant amount of understanding. In a cockpit, you start talking about who’s flying the aircraft or which way we are going to turn or which emergency procedure we are going to use … it’s the same thing with the doctor, nurse or the medic as it relates to the delivery of care,” said Brig. Gen. Patrick Sargent, commander, PRMC, and a former Black Hawk pilot.

The HRO philosophy for health care is predicated on the concept that every member of an organization has equal say in ensuring the safety of patients.

“The concept of the HRO has the preoccupation with doing things much more efficiently and more safely. So in my mind it will not only enhance the overall delivery and quality of care, but also enhance the proficiency of our medics and doctors when they go out into the battlefield and provide support to our men and women who are in harm’s way” said Sargent.

An effective HRO requires a collective mindfulness, which can focus on identifying potential dangers, and that all members, from the doctors and nurses, to the housekeeping staff, communicate effectively; always willing to speak up and listen.

Horoho reinforced throughout the summit that Army Medicine has already been on the journey in becoming the world’s leader in HROs but there’s room to improve in order to achieve zero preventable harm.

“I think what our beneficiaries can expect is what they have expected in the past. And that is compassionate, high-touch, high-tech care that is consistent in the patient experience,” said Horoho. “We’ve made a decision that we will never be satisfied in Army Medicine, we will continually look at how we will get better.”

 

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Category: Leadership, News

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