Chaplains gather at K-Bay for CAST

| May 22, 2015 | 0 Comments
Gen. Vincent K. Brooks, commander USARPAC, presents the Army Commendation Medal to USARPAC's top noncommissioned officer chaplain's assistant, Staff Sgt. Adams D. Ewing, 8th MP Bde., 8th TSC, at the onset of the CAST seminar, May 14.

Gen. Vincent K. Brooks, commander USARPAC, presents the Army Commendation Medal to USARPAC’s top noncommissioned officer chaplain’s assistant, Staff Sgt. Adams D. Ewing, 8th MP Bde., 8th TSC, at the onset of the CAST seminar, May 14.

Story and photos by
Staff Sgt. Chris McCullough
U.S. Army-Pacific Public Affairs

 

KANEOHE — Chaplains and chaplain’s assistants from across the Pacific region gathered together, May 14-15, for Chaplaincy Annual Sustainment Training, here.

The annual chaplaincy conferences are held regionally and provide the Army’s chaplains and chaplain’s assistants a time for spiritual renewal, continuing education, networking and fellowship. They also provide the opportunity to maintain a high level of proficiency in the chaplain pastoral care ministry.

“It’s the chief chaplain’s program, where the region provides the opportunity for the chaplains and chaplain’s assistants to get together, and our themes are from the chief’s chaplain themes for that year,” said Chaplain (Col.) Michael W. Dugal, U.S. Army-Pacific Command.

In a time of drawdown, transformation and rebuilding, the CAST theme this year was “Delivering Religious Support to the Total Army,” which includes care to the caregiver. That included the issue how chaplains and chaplain’s assistants help commanders to meet the expected moral leadership of our armed forces,” Dugal explained.

The two-day training got underway with a visit from Gen. Vincent K. Brooks, commander, USARPAC, who espoused the importance of the Chaplain Corps.

“This role, the chaplaincy, is important,” said Brooks. “It always has been. I believe it always will be. It has withstood the tests of time and pressure and cultural change and ideologies, and laws and practices and accommodations, and still, it’s still there and the essence remains.”

Brooks referred back to the earliest days of the chaplain’s assistant mission, when on Aug. 14, 1900, the 14th Infantry Regiment commander, Col. Aaron S. Daggett, needing troops to scale a 30-foot fortification and lay down suppressive fire during the Boxer Rebellion in China, called for volunteers. Without hesitation, Calvin Pearl Titus, the Soldier most responsible for the chaplain’s assistant position, stepped forward and said, “I’ll try, sir.”

Titus was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions.

“Such is the nature of the chaplain’s assistant,” Brooks said. “Whatever you’re asked to do … you’ll try. You’ll give it your best.”

Brooks, Dugal and Sgt. Maj. Horace Lynwood Williams Jr., USARPAC chief chaplain assistant noncommissioned officer, then presented the Army Commendation Medal to USARPAC’s top NCO and junior enlisted Soldier chaplain’s assistants: Staff Sgt. Adams D. Ewing, 8th Military Police Brigade, 8th Theater Sustainment Command, and Pvt. Roderick R. Dixon, 673rd Army Support Element, Installation Management Command-Pacific.

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