Keys to success for joint operations in a multinational environment are respect, trust

| May 22, 2015 | 0 Comments
 Karen A. Iwamoto, Oahu Publishing Company Exhibitors and visitors pack the Sheraton Waikiki ballroom during the 2015 LANPAC Symposium and Exposition, Wednesday. LANPAC is an international event highlighting the role of land forces in the Indo-Asia-Pacific theater and their contributions to the Joint Force in peace and war.

Karen A. Iwamoto, Oahu Publishing Company
Exhibitors and visitors pack the Sheraton Waikiki ballroom during the 2015 LANPAC Symposium and Exposition, Wednesday. LANPAC is an international event highlighting the role of land forces in the Indo-Asia-Pacific theater and their contributions to the Joint Force in peace and war.

Sgt. Maj. Kanessa Trent
Defense Video & Imagery System

HONOLULU — More than 100 noncommissioned officers packed into a crowded room to listen to the first Senior Enlisted Panel during the Association of the United States Army Institute of Land Warfare LANPAC Symposium and Exposition, May 19.

While this is the third year for the LANPAC conference, the senior enlisted portion is new at the 2015 three-day symposium.

The panel was led by Command Sgt. Maj. Bryant Lambert, USARPAC senior enlisted adviser. Bryant said it was important to include a senior enlisted panel during LANPAC.

“The job of our NCOs is to instill discipline and ensure that the commander’s intent is accomplished. Regardless of the Army in which one serves, we have to give the authority to NCOs, train them properly and have the trust in those NCOs in different environments to be successful,” Lambert said.

“Our armies are very much alike in that we expect our NCOs to be creative, adaptive and confident in their ability to act on the ground without orders,” Lambert said. “You must train them first and instill the pride and discipline in them to be effective.”

Gen. Vincent K. Brooks, commander, U.S. Army-Pacific, addresses the audience during his keynote speech at the third annual LANPAC in Symposium and Exhibition, Tuesday. The three-day conference is a professional development forum sponsored by the Association of the United States Army Institute of Land Warfare. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Chris McCullough, U.S. Army Pacific Public Affairs)

Gen. Vincent K. Brooks, commander, U.S. Army-Pacific, addresses the audience during his keynote speech at the third annual LANPAC in Symposium and Exhibition, Tuesday. The three-day conference is a professional development forum sponsored by the Association of the United States Army Institute of Land Warfare. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Chris McCullough, U.S. Army Pacific Public Affairs)

Each panelist agreed the foundation for successful military relationships transcends cultural and language barriers or the uniform one wears for his or her nation as a Soldier, Sailor, Airmen or Marine.

“We will find that, regardless of the uniform we wear, we are more alike than we are different,” said Command Sgt. Maj. James P. Norman, 1st Corps. “Our problem sets are pretty generic when it comes to taking care of our young service men and women and ensuring they are trained to take on whatever mission they are given.”

The four-hours-long discussion covered joint operations in a multinational environment, but centered on respect, dignity and pride for the NCO Corps across the region. Without those crucial elements, every senior enlisted leader stated that creating a mutually supportive coalition team is difficult and creates challenges that are easily overcome by developing mutual trust.

All 10 of the panel members spoke repeatedly about everything in the land forces domain being a human endeavor and that people are the center of gravity.

The Mongolian Army senior enlisted leader said they’ve adopted the motto “Respect Creates Trust” as a training philosophy for their NCOs. Oyunbold discussed how soldiers from Mongolia participate in exercises and missions all over the world and how much of an emphasis his country has placed on education in the NCO Corps the past two decades.

“Mongolia was closed off from the rest of the world until 20 years ago, and as Mongolian citizens are traveling around the world and bringing back a lot of different perspectives, knowledge, ideas … and participating in the multinational environment, our NCOs are seeing things in a different way,” Oyunbold said.

“They’ve grown more mature and analyze things in different ways. It’s really been wonderful and brings a lot of value to our NCO Corps,” he added.

U.S. Forces Korea Sgt. Maj. John Troxell talked about how NCOs always figure out a way to communicate and get to know one another, no matter where they are from, but said the U.S. military, and its partner nations, need to continue to hone horizontal communication in order to be more effective in a joint and multinational capacity.

“Interoperability is the ability, confidence and comfort to operate in any environment,” Troxell said.

“I think it’s important that we get the operational aspect down to the Soldier level,” agreed Norman. “By having all the senior enlisted leaders from all the different countries sitting on a panel together, we can not only shape what our generals and our chiefs are doing, but we can take that and translate it into operational language that our Soldiers can understand.”

Working in a coalition environment, the senior enlisted leaders emphasized that NCOs need to discuss national caveats, so everyone is aware of what Soldiers can and cannot do.

Lambert

Lambert

“Just because they cannot do something does not mean they are less effective, but it’s a restriction by law,” Lambert said. “We must teach, coach and mentor our subordinates to understand those restrictions and that they are not violated. We know that even if we have restrictions, our NCOs will overcome that, accomplish the mission, build the bond and strengthen relationships.”

“In order to get the team moving together, we know what the glue is: It’s the noncommissioned officer,” Lambert said.

International Panel

Panelists from across the region included the following:

•U.S. Army, Pacific, Command Sgt. Maj. Bryant Lambert (panel lead).

•U.S. Forces Korea, Sgt. Maj. John Troxell.

•U.S. Marine Forces, Pacific, Sgt. Maj. William T. Stables.

•1st Corps, Command Sgt. Maj. James P. Norman.

•New Zealand Army Sgt. Maj., Warrant Officer Mark Motriboy.

•Australian Army Warrant Officer David Galloway.

•Mongolian Army SEA, Lead Sgt. Daribish Oyunbold.

•Chief Warrant Officer Siak Ping NG, Singapore Armed Forces.

•8th Theater Sustainment Command, Command Sgt. Maj. Charles Tobin.

•Communications Electronics Command, Command Sgt. Maj. William Bruns.

 

Tags: , , , ,

Category: DVIDS, News

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *