Vigilant Guard/Makani Pahili 2015 closes

| June 12, 2015 | 0 Comments
Soldiers from the Hawaii National Guard Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Enhanced Response Force Package (CERF-P) process victims of a mock mass casualty chemical incident through a decontamination tent during Exercise Vigilant Guard/Makani Pahili 2015 at Queens Medical Center West Oahu, Hawaii, June 6, 2015. The exercise included Queens hospital emergency room personnel and soldiers from the Hawaii Army National Guard participating in a combined disaster and hurricane preparedness exercise sponsored by the U.S. Northern Command, National Guard Bureau and the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Airman 1st Class Robert Cabuco)

Hawaii National Guardsmen process victims of a mock mass casualty chemical incident through a decontamination tent during Exercise Vigilant Guard/Makani Pahili 2015 at Queens Medical Center West Oahu, Hawaii, June 6. The exercise included Queens hospital emergency room personnel and Guard participating in a combined disaster and hurricane preparedness exercise sponsored by the U.S. Northern Command, National Guard Bureau and the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency. (Airman 1st Class Robert Cabuco, Air National Guard)

Pfc. Paul Berzinas
117th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment

HONOLULU — More than 2,200 National Guardsmen, active duty service members, and civilian personnel participated in Vigilant Guard/Makani Pahili 2015, a disaster preparedness exercise held in Hawaii.

The exercise, sponsored by U.S. Northern Command and the National Guard Bureau, combined the Vigilant Guard exercise with Hawaii’s Makani Pahili hurricane readiness exercise.

Nearly 700 of the service members who participated in the exercise came from outside of Hawaii, traveling to various islands from states in the continental U.S.

Soldiers from Hawaii National Guard Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Enhanced Response Force Package (CERF-P) wash contaminants off a victim in a mobile decontamination unit during Exercise Vigilant Guard/Makani Pahili 2015 at Queens Medical Center West Oahu, Hawaii, June 6, 2015. The exercise included Queens hospital emergency room personnel and soldiers from the Hawaii Army National Guard participating in a combined disaster and hurricane preparedness exercise sponsored by the U.S. Northern Command, National Guard Bureau and the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Airman 1st Class Robert Cabuco)

A simulated chemical victim is decontaminated in a mobile decontamination unit during Exercise Vigilant Guard/Makani Pahili 2015 at Queens Medical Center West Oahu, Hawaii, June 6, 2015. The exercise included Queens hospital emergency room personnel and soldiers from the Hawaii Army National Guard participating in a combined disaster and hurricane preparedness exercise sponsored by the U.S. Northern Command, National Guard Bureau and the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Airman 1st Class Robert Cabuco)

The Makani Pahili portion of the exercise focused on preparation for and response to a hurricane disaster scenario in Hawaii.

The National Guard portion of the exercise was run from Joint Task Force 5-0, an Army tactical operations command center responsible for assigning tasks to the military units participating in the exercise.

The purpose of the exercise was to ensure that National Guard units know what resources they have at their disposal in the event of a catastrophic natural disaster, and that they have plans that involve active duty military units and civilians in order to more effectively respond to a disaster.

“The plans that we’re developing now will be applicable to the Hawaiian Islands,” said Tech. Sgt. Charles E. Brodie, an airman working in information operations for JTF 5-0. “Critical infrastructure has already been laid out. There could be a tsunami, a hurricane, an earthquake or fires; it doesn’t matter.”

Involving civilian disaster response teams allowed military and civilian personnel to optimize joint disaster response strategy.

“The civilian team that we’ve had working with us has been enormously helpful,” said Brodie. “They have real-world experience in how assets need to be deployed and how they’re used.”

Tech Sgt. Charles E. Brodie works to generate damage assessments in the Joint Task Force 5-0 during the Vigilant Guard/Makani Pahili 2015 exercise. Brodie is working in information operations at JTF 5-0. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Pfc. Paul D. Berzinas/Released)

Tech Sgt. Charles E. Brodie works to generate damage assessments in the Joint Task Force 5-0 during the Vigilant Guard/Makani Pahili 2015 exercise. Brodie is working in information operations at JTF 5-0. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Pfc. Paul D. Berzinas/Released)

 

 

 

The National Guard’s role was to support civil authorities in the recovery effort, said Spc. Ruth R. Wagner, acting noncommissioned officer in charge of intelligence operations for JTF 5-0. Civilian involvement in this exercise was absolutely necessary for creating a realistic disaster scenario.

Creating a joint National Guard, active duty military and civilian authority environment is critical for effective, real-world disaster preparedness training.

“If we don’t have that, then there’s really no exercise or us,” said Wagner.

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Category: Exercises, News, Training

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