8th MPs join Special Olympics torch run

| June 22, 2015 | 0 Comments
Torch Run participants carry the Flame of Hope into the Les Murakami Stadium after finishing the 3-mile 30th Annual Troy Barboza Law Enforcement Torch Run, May 29. The run is part of a worldwide series of torch runs that signals the start of the Special Olympics season.

Torch Run participants carry the Flame of Hope into the Les Murakami Stadium after finishing the 3-mile 30th Annual Troy Barboza Law Enforcement Torch Run, May 29. The run is part of a worldwide series of torch runs that signals the start of the Special Olympics season.

Story and photos by
Staff Sgt. Taresha Hill
8th Military Police Brigade Public Affairs
8th Theater Sustainment Command

HONOLULU — Nearly 300 Soldiers from within the 8th Military Police Brigade, 8th Theater Sustainment Command, joined law enforcement professionals from across the islands of Hawaii during the Troy Barboza Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olympics, here, recently.

Each year, Soldiers and family members seize the opportunity to run in the 3-mile event to help show their support and to raise awareness, along with funds, for Special Olympics-Hawaii.

Watchdog Soldiers and family members from the 8th Military Police Brigade participate in the 30th Annual Troy Barboza Law Enforcement Torch Run, May 29.

Watchdog Soldiers and family members from the 8th Military Police Brigade participate in the 30th Annual Troy Barboza Law Enforcement Torch Run, May 29.

“It’s a worthy cause,” said Col. Duane Miller, commander, 8th MP Bde. “It commemorates those that serve our community and those that have given their final devotion to duty.”

This year marked the 30th year for the Law Enforcement Torch Run, which was named after Troy Barboza, a fallen Honolulu police officer who dedicated his time to coaching Special Olympics athletes.

The run is part of a worldwide series of torch runs, which stretches across all 50 states and over 40 nations.

In addition to raising awareness, this year Special Olympics-Hawaii honored three volunteers who were inducted into the Special Olympics Hall of Fame.

Chief Antonio Williams, chief of civilian police, U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii, said being inducted was a great honor, but it came as a complete surprise.

“I’m speechless,” said Williams. “I don’t do this for the recognition, but I feel like there is no greater passion other than helping people.”

Chief Antonio Williams (right), chief of civilian police, U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii, is inducted into the Special Olympics Hall of Fame during the 30th Annual Troy Barboza Law Enforcement Torch Run May 29. With him is Nancy Bottelo, Special Olympics-Hawaii president and CEO.

Chief Antonio Williams (right), chief of civilian police, U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii, is inducted into the Special Olympics Hall of Fame during the 30th Annual Troy Barboza Law Enforcement Torch Run May 29. With him is Nancy Bottelo, Special Olympics-Hawaii president and CEO.

The event began at Fort DeRussy and ended at the Les Murakami Stadium, on the Manoa campus of the University of Hawaii, as law enforcement, civilian and military personnel, including Watchdog Soldiers, poured into the stadium with the flame of hope, officially signaling the start of the Special Olympics season.

“It’s the best event of the year,” said Spc. James Page, a police officer with 39th MP Detachment’s bike patrol. “We get to interact with the public and raise awareness within the community.”

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