Combatives: Tripler NCOs train federal marshals in Army style

| July 17, 2015 | 0 Comments
Members of the U.S. marshals, the Bureau of ATF, and U.S. ICE agents practice techniques taught by TAMC NCOs during Modern Army Combatives Program training.

Members of the U.S. marshals, the Bureau of ATF, and U.S. ICE agents practice techniques taught by TAMC NCOs during Modern Army Combatives Program training.

Story and photos by
Jim “Goose” Guzior
Tripler Army Medical Center Public Affairs
HONOLULU — U.S. Army Soldiers; marshals; the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF); and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents gathered at Tripler Army Medical Center’s Physical Fitness Center, July 8-12, for training in the Modern Army Combatives Program.

The noncommissioned officers of TAMC’s Troop Command led the training for this elite group of island warriors.

Staff Sgt. Michael Etheridge, Modern Army Combatives Program NCO in charge for Troop Command at TAMC, was asked to provide the training after U.S. marshals viewed a demonstration of the program.

“I was approached by the U.S. marshals following a walk-through of training at our warehouse,” said Etheridge. “They wanted to know if we could provide nonlethal alternatives to scenario-based escalation of force that would be useful to agents in the field.”

U.S. marshal, ATF and ICE students concentrate on practicing the striking, weapons, ju jitsu, judo and Escalation of Force tactics they are learning during the Modern Army Combatives Program at the TAMC Physical Fitness Center.

U.S. marshal, ATF and ICE students concentrate on practicing the striking, weapons, ju jitsu, judo and Escalation of Force tactics they are learning during the Modern Army Combatives Program at the TAMC Physical Fitness Center.

Tactical training
Combatives training has become an integral part of the Army’s warrior culture. In 1995, the commander of the 2nd Ranger Battalion began researching, refining and developing changes to the Army’s Combatives doctrine.

Today’s Army combatives training incorporates jiu-jitsu (submissions), boxing (stand-up striking), wrestling (grappling or position control), judo (throws or sweeps), Muay Thai (striking), tae kwon do (kicking) and other martial arts doctrine.

“This week we are working close-quarter combatives training,” said Etheridge. “We are concentrating on striking, weapons, jiu jitsu, judo and Escalation of Force tactics and procedures,” added Etheridge.

“Outstanding students”
Members of this elite group of warriors and agents training at TAMC are most often in the news for tracking down dangerous, escaped convicts like the recent pair from Clinton Correctional Facility in New York. This type of training is critical to their daily missions.

“The U.S. marshals are required to have this type of training, but do not B1_TAMC_Combatives_003have a facilitator at this time, so it’s an honor for us to share this knowledge,” said Etheridge. “These guys can find themselves in hostile situations just as deadly as any Army firefight downrange. It is always best to be able to diffuse situations with nonlethal methods when possible.”

The training included drills and an introduction to the lessons where TAMC NCOs demonstrated a technique, then explained how or why to use it. Despite a little soreness, sweat and some bumps and bruises, the group was highly tuned to the lessons they were learning.

“These guys are outstanding students,” said Etheridge. “They are motivated, in good physical shape, and very receptive to the techniques that they are being taught.”

Gervin Miyamoto, the 19th and current U.S. marshal for the District of Hawaii, even took time out of his schedule for a visit along with TAMC provost marshal Kevin Guerrero. As the U.S. marshal in Hawaii, he leads an office of deputy U.S. marshals charged with enforcing laws and protecting the U.S. Federal District Court of Hawaii.

“This is great training for our people; we look forward to doing more,” said Miyamoto.

With the positive atmosphere surrounding this training, it may just be the first of many team-ups for TAMC and the Hawaii marshals and agents.

“I am working with the marshals to develop an ongoing training program so that they will be able to continue learning and sharpening their skills,” said Etheridge.

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Category: Community, Training

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