Safety guidance for loaned or detailed employees

| August 7, 2015 | 0 Comments
Photo courtesy of U.S. Army Public Health Command  Employees in this undated photo check a ventilation system. Loaned or detailed employees account for 40 percent of Occupational Safety and Health Association recordable injuries. The Safety Office recommends supervisors have a discussion about safety prior to these individuals reporting for duty.

Photo courtesy of U.S. Army Public Health Command
Employees in this undated photo check a ventilation system. Loaned or detailed employees account for 40 percent of Occupational Safety and Health Association recordable injuries. The Safety Office recommends supervisors have a discussion about safety prior to these individuals reporting for duty.

Army News Service
News Release

 

While all employees are exposed to workplace hazards, none are more at risk than loaned or detailed employees. In May, 40 percent of Occupational Safety and Health Association recordable injuries involved employees who were loaned or detailed to other shops during the time of injury.

Never assume loaned or detailed employees know all your workplace hazards.

To ensure there is a clear understanding of the common goal of protecting depot employees, the Safety Office recommends supervisors of the loaned or detailed employee have a discussion prior to, or immediately after, the individual reports for duty.

The supervisor of the loaned or detailed employee must ensure that the employee is trained on the following:

  • How to handle a situation if any unsafe condition arises on the job or they are requested to perform a job they are not qualified or trained for
  • Job hazard analysis and other safety procedures for applicable tasks
  • Personal protective equipment required on the job, where to go to obtain it and how to use it properly
  • Right to work in an environment free of recognized hazards
  • Appropriate clothing to wear to work: Items such as long sleeves, baggy pant legs, ties and coats may be dangerous around machinery, as well as rings, jewelry and long hair.
  • Proper use of equipment and tools they will be using to include material-handling devices
  • The tagging and reporting of defective tools
  • Proper lifting: Bend knees, keep back straight, get good grasp, keep load close to the body and use leg muscles. Always seek help for loads heavier than 45 pounds or too large for single person lift.
  • Shop emergency procedures and where fire exits are located

 

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Category: Army News Service, News, Safety

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