HIARNG instructs first responder skills during Exercise Keris Aman 2015

| August 21, 2015 | 0 Comments
U.S. Army Sgt. Challis Santos, left, and Sgt. 1st. Class Matthew Mitsui, right, both with the Hawaii Army National Guard Medical Detachment, practice first responder medical techniques with members of the Malaysian armed forces as part of Exercise Keris Aman 2015 at the Segenting Camp, Aug. 12, in Port Dickson, Malaysia. Keris Aman is the largest multinational training event this year and is co-hosted by the Malaysian armed forces and U.S. Pacific Command with representatives from 29 nations participating. The goals and objectives of the training event are to increase participants’ interoperability and peacekeeping skills prior to deployment to UN missions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Hubenthal)

Sgt. Challis Santos, left, and Sgt. 1st. Class Matthew Mitsui, Hawaii Army National Guard Medical Detachment, practice first responder medical techniques with members of the Malaysian armed forces as part of Exercise Keris Aman 2015 at the Segenting Camp, Aug. 12, in Port Dickson, Malaysia. Keris Aman is the largest multinational training event this year and is co-hosted by the Malaysian armed forces and U.S. Pacific Command with representatives from 29 nations participating. The goals and objectives of the training event are to increase participants’ interoperability and peacekeeping skills prior to deployment to UN missions.

 

Story and photos by Air Force Staff Sgt. Chris Hubenthal
Hawaii News Bureau
Defense Media Activity

PORT DICKSON, Malaysia — Hawaii Army National Guard combat medics trained alongside Malaysian army medical personnel to practice first responder casualty care as part of Exercise Keris Aman 2015 at the Segenting Camp, here, Aug. 12.

Keris Aman is the largest multinational peacekeeping training event this year and is co-hosted by the Malaysian Armed Forces and U.S. Pacific Command with representatives from 29 nations participating.

Both armed forces made an increased effort to better prepare Malaysian soldiers scheduled to deploy in a United Nations peacekeeping capacity by conducting the training.

Staff Sgt. Denise Wisniewski, HIARNG Medical Detachment combat medic, explained why the training was important.

“Today was an add-on to the exercise,” Wisniewski said. “It gives us an opportunity to learn what other countries do. The Malaysian military is very eager to learn, and we are eager to see what we can share with them.”

Malaysian army Cpl. Natasya Nazar, 2nd Medical Unit paramedic, applies a bandage to a simulated casualty during first responder medical training with the Hawaii Army National Guard as part of Exercise Keris Aman 2015 at the Segenting Camp, Aug. 12, in Port Dickson, Malaysia. Keris Aman is the largest multinational training event this year and is co-hosted by the Malaysian armed forces and U.S. Pacific Command with representatives from 29 nations participating. The goals and objectives of the training event are to increase participants’ interoperability and peacekeeping skills prior to deployment to UN missions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Hubenthal)

Malaysian army Cpl. Natasya Nazar, 2nd Medical Unit paramedic, applies a bandage to a simulated casualty during first responder medical training with the Hawaii Army National Guard.

The training included classroom academics and four hands-on stations focused on triage, splinting, hemorrhage control and opening an airway.

Malaysian army Lt. Col. (Dr.) Nick Amin, commander, 2nd Medical Battalion, said that the training can better equip Malaysian soldiers with skills needed to save lives.

“If we are trained to treat a patient in the field, hopefully the patient will have a better chance to survive before reaching the hospital,” Amin said. “This training is very important because we are preparing our staff, our team, for a non-war operation. A non-war operation is humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. There are a lot of things we need to learn and prepare for medically for that.”

Not only does the training provide familiarization and training for medical personnel preparing to deploy, but it also promotes building relationships between partner nations.

“I was fortunate enough to have participated in the Global Peace Operations Initiative (GPOI) Exercise last year in Indonesia, and we build a lot of good relationships,” Wisniewski said. “When we came to Malaysia this year, we saw a lot of familiar faces and they remembered us. We hope our training is going to help them.”

Wisniewski feels a sense of accomplishment and pride when involved in multinational exercises like Keris Aman.

“I’m so proud to be one of the participants in this GPOI exercise,” Wisniewski said. “I think we’ve learned a lot of things by sharing our experience, knowledge and skills.”

The U.S. Dept. of State-sponsored GPOI program assists partner nations with skills, facilities and equipment to increase indigenous peacekeeping capability and capacity.

Being a major troop contributing country, Malaysia and the Malaysian Armed Forces have extensive knowledge and experience in peacekeeping operations.

Hosting this type of training event in Malaysia enhances Malaysia’s peacekeeping capabilities and helps other participating nations benefit from the broad range of experience and knowledge represented.

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Category: Deployed Forces, News

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