Take a Stand! for safety with tips on traffic, turkey

| December 11, 2015 | 0 Comments

There are currently several electric turkey fryers on the market that provide the same deep-fried deliciousness without the propane and flames. However, using outdoor gas cookers can be safe if users follow safety guidelines.

There are currently several electric turkey fryers on the market that provide the same deep-fried deliciousness without the propane and flames. However, using outdoor gas cookers can be safe if users follow safety guidelines.

Arnold Iaea
Directorate of Installation Safety
U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii

The holidays bring good times and good cooking, but all must be extra vigilant when celebrating at holiday gatherings.

 

Impaired drivers

Many driving safety experts agree that the probability of drunk and impaired driving accidents increases between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day.

According to the National Highway and Traffic Safety Association, alcohol-related fatalities are about four times more likely at night and approximately three times more likely on weekends.

And, with around 16 percent of nighttime drivers testing positive for either illegal or prescription drugs nationally, motorists should remain especially aware on the road after sunset.

Always designate a sober driver before any event involving alcohol. Take the keys away from friends who are impaired, and never ride with a driver you suspect to be under the influence of either alcohol or drugs. Call a cab for both of you instead.

The facts are there: Don’t let impaired driving rob you of the spirit of the season. If you (or a battle buddy) have a substance abuse problem, contact your local Army Substance Abuse Program office.

 

Delicious, but dangerous

Deep-frying a turkey can be dangerous, especially for first-timers. A lot of things can go wrong with a fryer filled with hot oil.

If you’re looking to try your hand at deep-frying a turkey, here are a few safety and cooking tips from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and www.turkeydeepfryersinfo.com to help make your holiday meal delicious, not disastrous:

  • Select a cooking vessel large enough to completely submerge the turkey in oil without it spilling over. The oil should cover the turkey by 1 to 2 inches.

To determine the amount of oil needed, do a preliminary test using water. Place the turkey in the cooking utensil and add enough water to completely submerse it. Remove the turkey and measure the amount of water. This is the amount of oil needed.

  • Choose a safe location outdoors. The turkey fryer needs to be outside on a flat surface. Do not deep-fry a turkey in a garage or covered carport.
  • Always keep a fire extinguisher rated for grease fires nearby. Large oven mitts or fireplace gloves must also be worn. Always wear eye protection, although full-face protection would be even better. Do not allow guests, especially children and pets, near the turkey fryer.
  • When lowering the turkey into the oil, turn off the flame. Slowly and carefully, lower turkey into the hot oil. Constantly monitor the temperature of the oil with a thermometer during cooking. Never leave the hot oil unattended and allow about three to five minutes per pound cooking time.

After removing the turkey from the pot, drain the oil from the cavity. Check the temperature of the turkey with a food thermometer. The turkey is safely cooked when the food thermometer reaches a minimum internal temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit in the innermost part of the thigh and wing and the thickest part of the breast.

  • If the turkey is not done, immediately return it to the hot oil for additional cooking. When the turkey is done, remove it from the oil and place it on a sturdy tray lined with paper towels. The skin can be golden to dark brown to almost black. Let it rest about 20 minutes before carving.

 

More Online

Find other safety tips at https://safety.army.mil/.

(Editor’s note: Tips are excerpts from the U.S. Army Safety Center. Iaea is a safety specialist at DIS.)  

Tags: , , ,

Category: News, Take a Stand!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *