Ministry masters medevac at Dillingham

| December 18, 2015 | 0 Comments
Chaplains and chaplain assistants from the 25th ID load a litter onto a 25th CAB UH-60 Black Hawk as part of medevac training at Dillingham Airfield, Dec. 10. (Sgt, Daniel K. Johnson, 25th Combat Aviation Brigade, 25th Infantry Division)

Chaplains and chaplain assistants exit a 25th CAB UH-60 Black Hawk as part of medevac training at Dillingham Airfield, Dec. 10. (Sgt, Daniel K. Johnson, 25th Combat Aviation Brigade, 25th Infantry Division)

Sgt. Daniel K. Johnson
25th Combat Aviation Brigade Public Affairs
25th Infantry Division

DILLINGHAM AIRFIELD — Unit ministry teams from across the 25th Infantry Divison gathered, here, Dec. 10, to conduct tough, realistic MEDEVAC training with a Black Hawk from the 25th Combat Aviation Brigade.

This training is part of the division commander’s overall training guidance to ensure basic Soldier skills are reinforced throughout the division.

The training began with a hike up the Kealia trail, ascending over a thousand feet via 19 switchbacks on a 3-mile round trip.

Chaplains and chaplain assistants from the 25th ID load a litter onto a 25th CAB UH-60 Black Hawk as part of medevac training at Dillingham Airfield, Dec. 10. (Sgt, Daniel K. Johnson, 25th Combat Aviation Brigade, 25th Infantry Division)

Chaplains and chaplain assistants from the 25th ID load a litter onto a 25th CAB UH-60 Black Hawk as part of medevac training at Dillingham Airfield, Dec. 10. (Sgt, Daniel K. Johnson, 25th Combat Aviation Brigade, 25th Infantry Division)

This early morning physical training allowed the UMTs to build some esprit de corps before beginning the day’s training.

“It’s an experience,” said Spc. Andrewio Fennell, chaplain’s assistant, 2nd Squadron, 6th Cavalry Regiment, 25th CAB. “I like this type of training and don’t get to do it often, but I eat it up.”

The training began when a UH-60 Black Hawk, piloted by Chief Warrant Officers 2 Zachary Cole and Amy Fox of 3rd Battalion, 25th Avn. Regt., 25th CAB, took off.

“This will be my first experience flying in a Black Hawk,” said Fennell. “I really like training, and this nine-line training is something I haven’t done in a while.”

The UMTs broke into three groups and began a round robin through a radio operation station, a nine-line instruction station, and two stations to teach them how to assess casualties and load them into the helicopter.

“Our intent was for us to get out here and do proficiency training in basic Soldier tasks and skills for medevac,” said Chaplain (Capt.) Michael Turpin, 25th CAB. “All of the 25th ID UMTs are out here training today, about 35 personnel in total.”

Chaplains and chaplain assistants from the 25th ID prepare for medevac training at Dillingham Airfield, Dec. 10. (Sgt, Daniel K. Johnson, 25th Combat Aviation Brigade, 25th Infantry Division)

Chaplains and chaplain assistants from the 25th ID prepare for medevac training at Dillingham Airfield, Dec. 10. (Sgt, Daniel K. Johnson, 25th Combat Aviation Brigade, 25th Infantry Division)

“We need to reset on a basic Soldier skill set in the UMTs throughout the division in sync with the commander’s intent,” said Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Chul Kim, 25th ID. “This is an area they need practical training in.”

“This type of training is important so that our UMTs have familiarity with this process, so that when we’re on the battlefield and this happens, we’re not so distracted by what is going on,” said Turpin. “That way, we can focus on not only ministering to that wounded Soldier, but also support the people who are trying to get the Soldier the care he needs.”

The training was designed to ensure a realistic scenario to give the Soldiers the most intense training on the subject possible.

“There is nothing better than live training,” Turpin said. “Everything changed when the dust started flying up in our eyes and we saw, ‘Wait a second, this is noisy and chaotic!’ All of that has very tangible benefit for the teams.”

“This is by far the most realistic training I’ve seen in my 18 years of chaplaincy,” said Kim.

This type of tough, realistic training is what keeps the 25th CAB ready to deploy and succeed at contingency missions in the Pacific. With this training, the UMTs are now better equipped to handle situations they may face in those missions.

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Category: Exercises, Leadership, News, Safety, Training

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