Mungadai leadership training transcends its original purpose

| December 18, 2015 | 0 Comments
Mungadai leadership training transcends its original purpose

Company commanders of the 2nd BCT, 25th ID, participated in a foot march along the beach, Dec. 3, at Bellows Air Force Base after performing an air assault mission as part of the Mungadai Leadership Training.

 

Story and photos by Sgt. Ian Ives
2nd Brigade Combat Team
25th Infantry Division Public Affairs

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — What makes a leader technically and tactically proficient?

Despite some common consensus, leaders are not born, but built through hard, meaningful training.

Company commanders with the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, were granted the opportunity to receive such training, Dec. 3-4, by taking part in the Mungadai challenge.

Mungadai leadership training put company commanders through a two-day exercise involving several road marches, an air assault mission to Bellows Air Force Station, traveling to historical military sites across the island of Oahu and a force-on-force paintball exercise.

U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ian Ives, 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs At the Hawaii State Cemetery in Kaneohe, Hawaii, company commanders of the 2nd BCT, 25th ID, received words of wisdom from Vietnam veteran Mr. Allen Hoe, Dec. 3, during the Mungadai Leadership Training. Hoe gave a testimonial on his son, 1st Lt. Nainoa Hoe, who died while serving with the 25th Infantry Division.

At the Hawaii State Cemetery in Kaneohe, Hawaii, company commanders of the 2nd BCT, 25th ID, received words of wisdom from Vietnam veteran Mr. Allen Hoe, Dec. 3, during the Mungadai Leadership Training. Hoe gave a testimonial on his son, 1st Lt. Nainoa Hoe, who died while serving with the 25th Infantry Division.

“The Mungadai is training that is loosely based off Genghis Khan’s notorious selection program for his cavalry leaders, which were called Mungadai,” said Capt. Jon Voss, planning and training section, 2nd BCT, and the officer in charge of the training. “Today, the U.S. Army uses it as training for leaders by putting them through an exhausting physical and mental challenge.”

During a trip to the Hawaii State Veterans Cemetery in Kaneohe, commanders met Allen Hoe, a Vietnam veteran, who shared the experience of losing his son, 1st Lt. Nainoa Hoe, 3rd Battalion, 21st Inf. Regiment, 1st BCT, 25th Inf. Division, during Operation Iraqi Freedom in 2005. Hoe shared stories of his time in Vietnam and of his son. The occasion was a chance for commanders to experience in the flesh the importance of their jobs as leaders.

“The most meaningful aspect of this training was their interaction with Mr. Hoe,” said Col. David Womack, commander, 2nd BCT, 25th ID. “There was a lot to be taken away from hearing his testimonial on his son’s service as an Army officer and his own service during Vietnam. To hear him and take away something from it connects us with our past.”

With events such as meeting Hoe, Mungadai training differs from most across the Army. While many Mungadai exercises focus mainly on physical fitness, 2nd BCT took a different approach: Historical aspects were added to help commanders build comradery and unit pride in addition to many physically demanding challenges.

U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ian Ives, 2nd Stryker BCT Public Affairs Company commanders of the 2nd BCT, 25th ID, executed an air assault mission from Schofield Barracks to Bellows Air Force Base, Dec. 3, during the Mungadai Leadership Training. The training that builds leadership skills as well as unit cohesion based of off Genghis Khan’s notorious cavalry selection.

Company commanders of the 2nd BCT, 25th ID, executed an air assault mission from Schofield Barracks to Bellows Air Force Base, Dec. 3, during the Mungadai Leadership Training. The training that builds leadership skills as well as unit cohesion based of off Genghis Khan’s notorious cavalry selection.

“When constructing this training, we were focused on balance,” said Womack. “To achieve this, we combined many different values and training ideas together to form this Mungadai. I was looking to see comradery form between commanders from different battalions, and after the training was complete, I saw just that.”

Following Mungadai, commanders will be more confident in their abilities as leaders and have the comfort of knowing that other commanders are supporting them.

“What I wanted my company commanders to take away from this training is having faith and confidence in each other,” said Womack. “I also hope that they each learned something unique about Hawaii, the unit and themselves.”

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Category: News, Year in Review

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