USARPAC details Indo-Asia Pacific actions

| December 18, 2015 | 0 Comments
Staff Sgt. Trish McMurphy, 28th Public Affairs Detachment Soldiers and Airmen demonstrate ways to secure and evacuate casualties to Chinese soldiers during the DME held at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Nov. 20. Participation in the DME demonstrates the U. S. and PRC can coordinate activities that enhance disaster and humanitarian response in the region to the benefit of Indo-Asian Pacific.

Staff Sgt. Trish McMurphy, 28th Public Affairs Detachment
Soldiers and Airmen demonstrate ways to secure and evacuate casualties to Chinese soldiers during the DME held at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Nov. 20. Participation in the DME demonstrates the U. S. and PRC can coordinate activities that enhance disaster and humanitarian response in the region to the benefit of Indo-Asian Pacific.

U.S. Army-Pacific
Public Affairs

FORT SHAFTER — Soldiers across U.S. Army-Pacific continue to make history training to deter threats, strengthening relationships with U.S. regional counterparts while promoting peace, security and stability across the Indo-Asia Pacific region.

“The Army is truly the backbone of the joint force,” said Gen. Vincent K. Brooks, USARPAC commander. “Since World War II, the United States has underwritten security in the region. This has allowed nations like Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, the Philippines, Malaysia, Vietnam, Indonesia and China to develop and thrive.”

The USARPAC command spans more than half of the earth’s surface and includes approximately 80,000 Soldiers stationed from the Pacific Northwest and Alaska and throughout the Indo-Asia Pacific region.

“As our nation continues to focus on the rebalance to the Pacific, we’re modernizing longtime alliances, building capacity and forging new partnerships across the region,” Brooks said.

Courtesy photo A 25th CAB Black Hawk practices deck landings on the USS Port Royal, Aug. 12.

Courtesy photo
A 25th CAB Black Hawk practices deck landings on the USS Port Royal, Aug. 12.

Currently, USARPAC conducts more than 250 annual military exercises and engagements. These range from small expert exchanges to large multinational military exercises involving thousands of U.S. Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines.

One of USARPAC’s recent success stories is Pacific Pathways, an innovative training concept launched in 2014 that is proving to be a valuable addition to the way USARPAC Soldiers engage with their host-nation partners in the region.

This year, USARPAC conducted three Pacific Pathways in the Indo-Asia Pacific.

“Pacific Pathways has been transformative in many ways, based on how the Army projects itself in a tailored structure around the region while building readiness into the deployed force” Brooks said. “USARPAC Soldiers are benefiting, too, because it allows experimentation with different technologies as industry and others find opportunities to shake something out in a tremendous battle lab that’s on the move.”

U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Maj. Kanessa Trent, USARPAC PAO Command Sgt. Maj. Bryant Lambert greets the Sergeant Major of the Philippines Armed Forces after the opening ceremony of the 9th Pacific Armies Chiefs Conference (PACC IX), Sept.

U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Maj. Kanessa Trent, USARPAC PAO
Command Sgt. Maj. Bryant Lambert greets the Sergeant Major of the Philippines Armed Forces after the opening ceremony of the 9th Pacific Armies Chiefs Conference (PACC IX), Sept.

Another type of training took place this year, enhanced two nations’ abilities to respond to natural and man-made disasters. USARPAC conducted two Disaster Management Exchanges (DME) with the People’s Liberation Army, strengthening the military-to-military relationship between the U.S. and China.

The DMEs allow increased cooperation and trust between our two nations, with the capacity to influence peace and security throughout the region. The first DME occurred in January and was held in China. The second exchange was held at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., in November. The DME proved an opportunity for open dialogue between our two countries and a forum to address collective abilities in response to natural disasters.

Pacific Pathways and the DME were topics of discussion during the Land Power in the Pacific Symposium and Exhibition hosted by the United States Association of the Army in Hawaii earlier this year. The three-day symposium incorporated USARPAC, Marine Corps Forces Pacific, and Special Operation Command Pacific in a variety of professional panels. Representatives from 20 of the 36 joint and regional partners in the Pacific attended.

USARPAC, in partnership with the Indonesian army, held the 9th Pacific Armies Chiefs Conference and 39th Pacific Armies Management Seminar (PAMS) in Denpasar, Indonesia. Army Chiefs of Staffs, senior land forces commanders from 26 of 38 countries throughout the region, along with their senior enlisted leaders, to include Sergeant Major of the Army Daniel Dailey, attended. The conferences were the largest multinational land forces seminars promoting security, peace and cooperation held in the Indo-Asia Pacific theater.

The chiefs conference was co-chaired by Gen. Mulyono Dilantik Menjadi, Indonesian Army chief of staff, and Gen. Mark A. Milley, U.S. Army chief of staff. The chiefs conference is a biennial executive defense forum for the army chiefs of staffs from countries throughout the Indo-Asia Pacific region, North America and parts of Europe.

PAMS XXXIX was co-chaired by Lt. Gen. Erwin Syafitri, Indonesian Army vice chief of staff and the USARPAC commander. PAMS is an annual seminar with three- to four-star general officers or equivalent that helps to build regional understanding through shared dialogue and experiences.

USARPAC will continue to promote peace and stability in the Indo-Asia Pacific region as the Army Service Component Command of the Pacific with support for its subordinate commands.

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Category: News, Year in Review

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