‘Bronco’ brigade ministry teams learn from mass casualty exercise

| January 29, 2016 | 0 Comments
Photo by Staff Sgt. Armando R. Limon, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division Sgt. Brenton Grierson (left), chaplain assistant, 29th Brigade Engineer Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division; Sgt. Gabrielle Jackson (middle), chaplain assistant, 325th Brigade Support Battalion, 3rd BCT, 25th ID; and Chaplain (Capt.) Kevin McCarty, 29th BEB, 3rd BCT, 25th ID, tie down a simulated wounded Soldier at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, on Jan. 14, 2016. The Soldiers participated mass casualty (MASCAL) training for chaplains and chaplain assistants to provide a better understanding on how to care for wounded Soldiers.

Sgt. Brenton Grierson (left), chaplain assistant, 29th Brigade Engineer Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division; Sgt. Gabrielle Jackson (middle), chaplain assistant, 325th Brigade Support Battalion, 3rd BCT, 25th ID; and Chaplain (Capt.) Kevin McCarty, 29th BEB, 3rd BCT, 25th ID, tie down a simulated wounded Soldier at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, on Jan. 14, 2016. The Soldiers participated mass casualty (MASCAL) training for chaplains and chaplain assistants to provide a better understanding on how to care for wounded Soldiers.

Story and photo by Staff Sgt. Armando R. Limon
3rd Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs
25th Infantry Division

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — The chaplains of the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, hosted mass casualty (MASCAL) training for more than 30 chaplains and chaplain assistants of the 25th ID, here, Jan. 14.

The first part of the MASCAL training was held at the Soldiers’ Chapel for a discussion period prior to moving to E Quad for round robin training.

One of the speakers at the Soldiers’ Chapel, Chaplain (Capt.) Jonathan D. Todd, 325th Brigade Support Battalion, said before his peers that Soldiers know when chaplains are faking and not putting full effort in their unit ministry teams (UMT).

“They can figure out when we actually care,” Todd said. “They know when we don’t know where they’re at, when we don’t put on our gear, and when we don’t share their sweat and our blood.”

He spoke on the most effective measure when talking and dealing with Soldiers.

“If our ministry focus remains on love, we will be successful helping people walk through, potentially the most difficult periods of their lives,” he said. “Our service is love.”

Photo by Staff Sgt. Armando R. Limon, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division Sgt. Kaelin Zirkle, emergency care NCO, Company C, 325th Brigade Support Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, gives a class on how to properly load a litter inside an ambulance at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, on Jan. 14, 2016. The training was part of a mass casualty (MASCAL) training for chaplains and chaplain assistants within the 25th ID.

Sgt. Kaelin Zirkle, emergency care NCO, Company C, 325th Brigade Support Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, gives a class on how to properly load a litter inside an ambulance.

After the hour long discussion session had ended, the chaplains and chaplain assistants moved to Quad E to learn how to handle and move a litter in and out of an ambulance. They also received an introduction to a basic aid station and training in the field.

Sgt. Brenton Grierson, chaplain assistant, 29th Bde. Engineer Bn., found the training with his peers to be extremely valuable.

“This is important to lay the ground work, like any other Army training,” Grierson said. “Basically, you want to build that muscle memory and the memory that the situation happens in. You’re out there getting information from the PAD (Patient Administration Division), helping people unload casualties from the medevac, and you’re caring for the wounded, who are basically ambulatory wounded, who might be in shock trying to get them to calm down.”

He went on to describe the training and muscle memory, so a chaplain or a chaplain assistant can instantly react to a MASCAL situation.

Many of the chaplains present who had deployed, such as Chaplain (Capt.) Stacie Kervin, 2-6th Cavalry Regiment, 25th Combat Aviation Bde., found the training as an excellent refresher.

“I thought that was great training because I was a chaplain deployed to Mosul, Iraq,” Kervin said. “We did have a situation where we had a MASCAL, and sometimes, when chaplains haven’t been through the situation, they don’t how to respond or react. Sometimes, even the medical staff go through that experience; they practice it, but when it really happens in that moment, everyone responds differently.”

She complemented on how well the training went and how effective it was for members of UMTs who had not been deployed or dealt with a MASCAL situation at home.

“They’ll have that information, and they’ll be able to be an asset to the team, not only to the unit ministry team, but also to their unit, too,” she said.

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Category: Exercises, News

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