Volunteers recognized for efforts in helping SB community

| April 29, 2016 | 1 Comment
Ingrid Cureton poses for a photo with Maj. Gen. Charles Flynn, commanding officer of 25th Infantry Division and Sgt. Maj. Scott A. Brzak, command sergeant major of 25th ID. Cureton was recognized for her community service with Boy Scouts of America Troop 24.

Ingrid Cureton poses for a photo with Maj. Gen. Charles Flynn, commanding officer of 25th Infantry Division and Sgt. Maj. Scott A. Brzak, command sergeant major of 25th ID. Cureton was recognized for her community service with Boy Scouts of America Troop 24.


Story and photo by

Christine Cabalo
Staff Writer

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — U.S. Army Hawaii celebrated people positively influencing the community during the Volunteer Recognition Ceremony held at the Nehelani, here, April 22.

“The reality of it is, so many volunteers sacrifice to do what they can to help others,” said Maj. Gen. Charles Flynn, senior commander of U.S. Army Hawaii and commanding general of 25th Infantry Division. “It’s not about what we get as volunteers, but what we are giving.”

Partnerships
In his speech, Flynn said volunteers come from all walks of life to serve multiple needs of a community and a volunteer’s impact reaches many. He then spoke about the longstanding partnership in the Army with local residents, especially in Wahiawa, to improve community conditions.

This partnership continues today as Leilehua High School’s mascot is the Mighty Mules, the same symbol as the U.S. Army and the mascot of West Point Academy.

Although more than 30 volunteers were recognized with awards, Flynn asked everyone in the audience to stand if they had ever volunteered. When both the awarded volunteers and those in the audience stood, Flynn led the room in a round of applause for their collective efforts.

This year more than 90,575 hours were spent in support of various volunteer projects in Hawaii, according to records of their time listed in the Volunteer Management Information System, or VMIS. This time saved USARHAW officials more than $2.233 million in costs to upkeep local projects.

Erin Paulus, Army Volunteer Corps Coordinator with Army Community Service presents a check of volunteer time and money saved to senior Army Hawaii command. More than 90,575 volunteer hours were logged through the Volunteer Management Information System.

Erin Paulus, Army Volunteer Corps Coordinator with Army Community Service presents a check of volunteer time and money saved to senior Army Hawaii command. More than 90,575 volunteer hours were logged through the Volunteer Management Information System.

Erin Paulus, Army Volunteer Corps coordinator for Army Community Service, presented a check for the amount to Flynn and the command staff of U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii.

Both USAG-HI units and civilian organizations, such as the Boy Scouts of America, recognized their selected volunteers of the year at the ceremony. Each recognized volunteer earned a certificate presented by Flynn and Sgt. Maj. Scott A. Brzak, senior enlisted leader, 25th ID.

Of those recognized, additional awards were provided to the Soldier, civilian and family Volunteers of the Year.
• Capt. Forrest Cureton was selected as the Soldier Volunteer of the Year for his extensive work with the Boy Scouts of America Troop 24.
• Chantay Burleson was named as the Civilian Volunteer of the Year.
• Cureton was also recognized alongside his wife Ingrid Cureton as the Family Volunteer of the Year.

Capt. Cureton was an Eagle Scout himself and said the troop camps out 10 months a year.

“The Boy Scouts offers leadership skills for boys, gives them a chance for community involvement and volunteering, and keeps them out of trouble,” Capt. Cureton said. “It helps teach life skills, so they can find themselves and what they want to do as adults.”

Both Capt. Cureton and Ingrid Cureton also received the Na Koa Bronze pin for their efforts.

Capt. Forrest Cureton shakes the hand of Maj. Gen. Charles Flynn, commanding officer of 25th Infantry Division, before Cureton receives the Na Koa Bronze pin. Cureton was recognized for his community service with Boy Scouts of America Troop 24.

Capt. Forrest Cureton shakes the hand of Maj. Gen. Charles Flynn, commanding officer of 25th Infantry Division, before Cureton receives the Na Koa Bronze pin. Cureton was recognized for his community service with Boy Scouts of America Troop 24.

The Na Koa awards recognize adults and youths who have volunteered multiple hours of community service since the awards were established in January 2014. Those who receive the Na Koa Bronze pin have completed a minimum of 500 hours since 2014 that is registered in VMIS.

A total of 20 volunteers were also recognized with Na Koa Lapel pins, signifying they’ve completed at least 300 hours as adults or 150 hours as a youth volunteer.

Ingrid Cureton, who has also assisted Boy Scouts of America Troop 24, said volunteers are essential to success of a project.
“As a volunteer, it’s important to help where help is needed,” she said. “It’s great to give to the community.”

Getting Involved
For a detailed list of military-affiliated and civilian nonprofit organizations that need volunteers, visit www.himwr.com/images/ACS/VJO.pdf.
To learn more about the Army Corps of Volunteers program and how to nominate volunteers for awards, see www.himwr.com/getting-involved/army-volunteer-corp.

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Category: Community, Community Relations, Leadership

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