1-14th finds new respect for Hawaiian military culture

| June 2, 2016 | 0 Comments
Soldiers assigned to Alpha Company, 1st Bn., 14th Inf. Regt., 25th ID, pose on Pali Cliffs where the conclusion of the Nu‘uanu Battle took place. (Photos by Staff Sgt. Scott Simpson, Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment)

Soldiers assigned to Alpha Company, 1st Bn., 14th Inf. Regt., 25th ID, pose on Pali Cliffs where the conclusion of the Nu‘uanu Battle took place. (Photos by Staff Sgt. Scott Simpson, Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment)

Capt. Katie Richesin
2nd Brigade Combat Team Civil Affairs
25th Infantry Division
SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — Waikiki has the reputation of being the center of tourism on Oahu and offers one of the most popular beaches in the world.

Its idyllic backdrop and soft ocean waves make it the dream of many people around the world to come and visit.

Brenden Bliss, a Hawaii Pacific University professor (second right), joins Alpha Co., 1st Bn., 14th Inf. Regt., 25th ID, at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific to discuss the main defenses and strategy of the Oahu allies.

Brenden Bliss, a Hawaii Pacific University professor (second right), joins Alpha Co., 1st Bn., 14th Inf. Regt., 25th ID, at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific to discuss the main defenses and strategy of the Oahu allies.

It is easy to forget that in 1795, Waikiki was the site of King Kamehameha’s invasion to unite the Hawaiian Islands.

1st Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment, explored Waikiki, Punchbowl and the Pali cliffs, looking at them from a different viewpoint.

Tactically speaking
“Being able to see the tactics the Hawaiians used helped us in our own battle drills,” said Staff Sgt. Scott Simpson, an Alpha Company squad leader. “I have a new level of respect for the Hawaiian culture.”

“The battle of Nu‘uanu is important because of where we live,” said Staff Sgt. Richard Dyal, an A Co. platoon sergeant. “The local community has deep ties to those who were in the battle, and it is important to understand their history.”

The A Co. Soldiers prepared to make the most of their time while visiting the battle sites. They began with a 45-minute video and researched different parts of the battle. A total of 33 Soldiers participated in the training ensuring their junior and senior Soldiers were involved in this professional development opportunity.

SGT-Link-battle-conclusion“As a leader, it was good to get Soldiers involved in something they would not normally do,” Dyal stated. “The junior Soldiers were able to join in the discussion and build confidence.”

“Because we went over a broad overview, they were able to see the bigger picture. It also allowed work on their communication skills. It was a good learning environment because they were around their peers,” Simpson said.

The company also enlisted the aid of Professor Brendon Bliss, Hawaii Pacific University, to expand upon the company’s self-study.

SSG-Norva-discussing“Written history is vague. Having someone who studied the culture and battle helped clear up what actually happened,” Simpson said.

The battle had approximately 25,000 warriors. Comparatively, the Battle of Bunker Hill had only 5,400 Soldiers involved. This makes the Battle of Nu‘uanu one of the largest battles in the world at the time.

“I have a new level of respect for culture on the island. Their history is as colorful as those in the lower 48,” Simpson said.

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Category: Community, Training

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