Big help on Big Island

| June 24, 2016 | 0 Comments
Pfc. Mark A. Jansz, dental assistant,185th Dental Co. Area Support, Vallejo, Calif., prepares to suction saliva during a cavity filling during Tropic Care 2016, 31 May 2016, Ka'u, Hawaii.

Capt. Jay Toth (left) and dental assistant Pfc. Mark A. Jansz work on a patient during a cavity filling during Tropic Care 2016, May 31, Ka‘u, Hawaii.

Sgt. Rachel Grothe
305th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment

KA’U, Hawaii — Military medical personnel from as far away as the U.K. and Germany gathered their wide range of expertise in the middle of Earth’s largest ocean during Tropic Care 2016 to help people in the rural areas of the Big Island get the healthcare they need.

“It’s great to help people in need, especially when you make a connection and they come back a second time because they had a good experience the first time,” said Pfc. Mark A. Jansz, dental assistant, 185th Dental Company Area Support, Garden Grove, Calif.

“I came here last time they had a clinic here,” said Edwina Akana, Ka‘u resident, before receiving treatment for a bad toothache. “They helped me a lot. When I saw they were coming back, I walked down from my house.”

“We did two fillings and extracted a broken tooth root in her gum,” said U.S. Army Capt. Jay E. Toth, 1984th U.S. Army Hospital Pacific, Detachment 2, Fort Shafter Flats, Hawaii.

Capt. Jay E. Toth, dentist, 1984th U.S. Army Hospital Pacific, 9th Mission Support Command, Fort Shafter Flats, Hawaii, fills a cavity for Ka'u resident, Edwina Akana, during Tropic Care 2016, May 31, 2016.

Capt. Jay E. Toth, dentist, 1984th U.S. Army Hospital Pacific, 9th Mission Support Command, fills a cavity for a Ka’u resident, May 31.

“She was really happy with her first Tropic Care experience two years ago, and looked really happy when she left,” said Jansz.

“It feels good, providing a service that really helps improve quality of life without taking away from their food budget or other family necessities,” said Toth.

These services are good for the community while also providing hands-on experience for the service members performing them. The support services incidentally serve as required training for the service members involved, keeping their skills intact.

“It’s a good learning experience. I don’t do this full time. I work two civilian jobs and I’m going to school full time, working toward becoming a civilian dental hygienist. Capt. Toth was really patient, explaining everything as we went. I learned a lot,” explained Jansz.

Tags: , , , ,

Category: Health, News

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *