SLICC visits 25th ID, certifiies sling load inspectors

| June 24, 2016 | 0 Comments
SCHOFIELD BARRACKS, Hawaii Ñ A group of Soldiers prepare a HMMWV for a sling load mission June 10, for the Sling Load Inspector Certification Course (SLICC) at East Range, Schofield Barracks.  The 25th Sustainment Brigade hosted the U.S. Army SLICC for Soldiers from across the 25th Infantry Division to attend June 6-10.

A group of Soldiers prepare a humvee for a sling load mission, June 10, for the Sling Load Inspector Certification Course at East Range. The 25th Sustainment Brigade hosted the  SLICC, June 6-10.

 

Story and photos by Sgt. Ian Ives
25th Sustainment Brigade
25th Infantry Division Public Affairs

 

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — The 25th Sustainment Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, hosted members of the U.S. Army Quartermaster Corps’ Sling Load Inspector Certification Course (SLICC) out of Fort Lee, Va., for Soldiers from across the division to attend June 6-10, here. The purpose of the course is to certify select Soldiers in the ranks of specialist or above as sling load inspectors.

The ability to inspect sling loads is a valuable asset to any unit and gives them the capability to ensure the safety of the equipment and the Soldiers rigging it. In a deployed environment, a sling load operation saves time, money and possibly the lives of Soldiers who would normally use ground transportation to move equipment. At the Air Assault School, Soldiers are taught the basic concepts of sling loads, however, Soldiers graduating SLICC have more knowledge and the authority to coordinate, execute and supervise sling load operations.

“The main difference between this school and Air Assault School is that we are the proponent agency for sling load operations,” said Sgt. 1st Class Kenneth Scott, noncommissioned officer in charge, SLICC. “Air Assault School touches on sling loads, but we go more in depth and certify Soldiers to inspect sling loads. When our students graduate, they will be in charge and responsible for the success of the mission as well as the appropriate paperwork.”

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS, Hawaii Ñ Staff Sgt. Michael Davis, an instructor with the Sling Load Inspector Certification Course (SLICC) out of Fort Lee, Va., instructs Tropic Lightning Soldiers on how to properly rig a sling load June 10, at East Range, Schofield Barracks. The 25th Sustainment Brigade hosted the U.S. Army SLICC for Soldiers from across the 25th Infantry Division to attend June 6-10.

Staff Sgt. Michael Davis, an instructor with the SLICC out of Fort Lee, Va., shows how to properly rig a sling load.

The course consists of two days of classroom work learning various weights and holding capacities of aircrafts. The following days of the weeklong course entail learning to inspect and rig sling loads. On the fourth day of training, the Soldiers are tested on the new skills they have acquired with a written test and a hands-on portion where they inspect multiple rigged loads while filling out the requisite forms.

“Once the testing is complete – if the unit we are teaching has coordinated it – we take the Soldiers through a live mission,” said Scott. “We like to do this so that they can see what is like to actually be underneath the aircraft during a sling load operation. Some Soldiers have never been around an aircraft before, so this gives them a chance to go out there and get a hands on feel for it.”

Following the completion of the course, the Soldiers who graduate become experts on sling load operations and the steps it takes for successful mission.

“Now I have a wealth of knowledge that I can pass on to future Soldiers who want to go to Air Assault or SLICC,” said Sgt. Edwardo Gonzalez, a quartermaster chemical equipment repair NCO with the 40th Composite Supply Company, 524th Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 25th Sust. Bde. “I can also help my unit’s mission readiness by giving classes at the battalion or brigade level on how to perform sling load operations. This is a course I will encourage my Soldiers to attend in the future, because the skills you learn in SLICC are invaluable.”

This iteration of the course has produced 41 new certified sling load inspectors that will return to their respective units with new knowledge that increases for their units mission readiness and the mission readiness of the entire 25th ID.

 

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS, Hawaii Ð Sgt. Edwardo Gonzalez, a quartermaster chemical equipment repair noncommissioned officer with the 40th Composite Supply Company, 524th Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 25th Sustainment Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, inspects a A-22 cargo net rig June 8, as part of the Sling Load Inspector Certification Course (SLICC) at Schofield Barracks. The 25th Sust. Bde. hosted the U.S. Army SLICC for Soldiers from across the 25th Infantry Division to attend June 6-10.

Sgt. Edwardo Gonzalez, a quartermaster chemical equipment repair NCO with the 40th Composite Supply Company, inspects a A-22 cargo net rig, June 8. 

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