TAMC recognized for training healthcare providers

| July 22, 2016 | 0 Comments
Regional Health Command-Pacific (RHC-P), and its subordinate military treatment facilities, are an integral part of Army Medicine's training mission. Two residents in the graduate health education program at Tripler Army Medical Center perform a hysterectomy using state-of-art-technology. The DaVinci robot allows surgeons to perform surgeries using minimally invasive techniques. (Photo by Emily Yeh, Regional Health Command-Pacific, Public Affairs)

Regional Health Command-Pacific (RHC-P), and its subordinate military treatment facilities, are an integral part of Army Medicine’s training mission. Two residents in the graduate health education program at Tripler Army Medical Center perform a hysterectomy using state-of-art-technology. The DaVinci robot allows surgeons to perform surgeries using minimally invasive techniques. (Photo by Emily Yeh, Regional Health Command-Pacific, Public Affairs)

Emily Yeh
Regional Health Command-Pacific
HONOLULU — Army medicine has a proud tradition of supporting graduate medical education programs throughout its healthcare facilities worldwide. For decades, Army medicine has worked to train the military healthcare team of the future through its Graduate Health Education (GHE) program. Regional Health Command-Pacific (RHC-P), and its subordinate military treatment facilities, are an integral part of Army Medicine’s training mission.

Tripler Army Medical Center and Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, Wash., and, both military treatment facilities within RHC-P’s area of responsibility are primary Army academic medical centers offering the GHE training platform.

“Regional Health Command-Pacific strives to train future military healthcare teams to practice state-of-the-art medicine in military treatment facilities and deployed settings around the world, states Col. Thomas Rogers, Assistant Chief of Staff, Clinical Operations, RHC-P.

“Every military treatment facility, from the largest medical center to the smallest clinic, within RHC-P’s area of responsibility and throughout Army Medicine, strives to promote the health and wellness of our nation’s military families. Every service provided by our medical centers is patient centered.”

The military graduate health education programs prepare military health service leaders to champion safety, quality, innovation and research, while constantly developing and strengthening the curriculum to best prepare graduates for the evolving needs of patients and the healthcare system.

Graduate Health Education students celebrate their achievement at a graduation ceremony held at Tripler Army Medical Center, Hawaii, recently.

Graduate Health Education students celebrate their achievement at a graduation ceremony held at Tripler Army Medical Center, Hawaii, recently.

Tripler’s GHE programs are no stranger to success. Tripler is a major teaching facility, sponsoring 12 accredited physician training programs with 240 resident positions. It produces 15 percent of the Army’s licensed physicians each year. The internal medicine residency program is the oldest graduate professional health education program at Tripler. It received its initial accreditation in February 1949.

Tripler also held a graduate professional health education commencement recently. At the ceremony 131 military healthcare professionals were honored. The graduating class consisted of Army officers, a U.S. Public Health Service officer as well as civilians. There were 116 physicians; four nurse anesthetists (each receiving their Doctor of Nursing Practice degree), six psychologists, two pharmacists, two health care administrators and one oral and maxillofacial surgeon who graduated.

Next assignments
Many of the active duty Army graduates from Tripler will move to operational assignments throughout the world, in places such as South Korea, Germany, Italy, Honduras, Alaska, the Mainland and Hawaii. Other graduates will begin additional residency training, fellowship training or start their professional careers.

Both Madigan and Tripler are an affiliated teaching facility with the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS). The majority of the trainees have either received a health professions scholarship or attended USUHS, and are selected competitively through a computerized match process run by the U.S. Army Office of the Surgeon General (OTSG) GME office each year.

“Tripler has enjoyed a robust program of faculty development opportunities in collaboration with the USUHS,” remarked Col. Kent DeZee, Chief, Directorate of Health Education and Training, Tripler. “The collaboration provides the trainees medical education platforms, including strong clerkship opportunities, coupled with the highest quality of education; ensuring that our beneficiaries receive highly reliable care at Tripler and throughout Army Medicine facilities,” added DeZee.

Training options
The GHE trainees spend one to six years in the medical and health training programs. The RHC-P’s providers learn and understand the challenges of delivering the best medicine regardless of the military medical environment in which they are practicing; in a hospital or deployed in the field. The GHE programs also encourage research and innovation to advance patient care with state-of-the-art technology. The RHC-P’s military treatment facilities are therefore able to produce exceptional educational outcomes with customized training to ensure graduates are well prepared to care for the population of healthcare beneficiaries they serve.

“Leadership, teamwork, professionalism and resiliency are essential components to the educational environment and curriculum,” explains Rogers. “We want our future providers to be well prepared to lead and collaborate both within the healthcare system and the larger military system,” added Rogers.

The military GHE programs are considered part of RHC-P’s brand of excellence. Beneficiaries, should and do, receive the highest quality of care from a network of multiple providers who work in a collaborative environment, always with the best interest of the beneficiary in mind.

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Category: Health

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