Army dives depths of RIMPAC with joint partners

| August 12, 2016 | 0 Comments
PACIFIC OCEAN (July 31, 2016) U.S. Army Pfc. Aaron Gougler, left, and Sgt. Billy Emory, right, both with the 7th Engineer Dive Detachment, conduct equipment checks for U.S. Army Spc. Theodore Archacki, also with the 7th Engineer Dive Detachment, prior to a dive supporting salvage operations during Rim of the Pacific 2016. Twenty-six nations, more than 40 ships and submarines, more than 200 aircraft, and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 30 to Aug. 4, in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world's largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world's oceans. RIMPAC 2016 is the 25th exercise in the series that began in 1971. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Hubenthal)

Pfc. Aaron Gougler, left, and Sgt. Billy Emory, right, conduct equipment checks for Spc. Theodore Archacki, prior to a dive supporting salvage operations during Rim of the Pacific 2016. The three diving Soldiers are with the 7th Dive Detachment.

 

Story and photos by Air Force Staff Sgt. Chris Hubenthal
Defense Media Activity – Forward Center Hawaii

JOINT BASE PEARL HARBOR-HICKAM — Army divers trained alongside Navy divers, July 31, during Rim of the Pacific 2016 (which ended Aug. 4).

Diving to depths of down to 70 feet below the ocean’s surface, Soldiers of 7th Dive Detachment, 65th Engineer Battalion, 130th Theater Eng. Brigade, 8th Theater Sustainment Command, and Sailors from Navy Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit One, moved simulated debris aboard Military Sealift Command rescue and salvage ship USNS Safeguard (T-ARS-50).

PACIFIC OCEAN (July 31, 2016) U.S. Army Pfc. Aaron Gougler, left, and Sgt. Billy Emory, right, both with the 7th Engineer Dive Detachment, conduct equipment checks for U.S. Army Spc. Theodore Archacki, also with the 7th Engineer Dive Detachment, prior to a dive supporting salvage operations during Rim of the Pacific 2016. Twenty-six nations, more than 40 ships and submarines, more than 200 aircraft, and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 30 to Aug. 4, in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world's largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world's oceans. RIMPAC 2016 is the 25th exercise in the series that began in 1971. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Hubenthal)

“These last two days were the culminating exercise for the dive portion of RIMPAC,” said Capt. Alessandro Licopoli, commander, 7th Dive Det. “This culminating exercise had them salvaging a heavy project. In this case, it was a 20-foot CONEX that’s been altered to give the appearance of a patrol boat.”

While exercise provided a chance for participants to practice diving techniques, Licopoli said the unique experience was its joint aspect.

“A large scale exercise like RIMPAC is a great opportunity for our divers to get a better sense and appreciation for the large scale and scope of military diving,” Licopoli said. “We do what we do on the land, but it’s also a great opportunity to see what our joint service brothers and sisters are doing in the open water and other applications. It really gives us an appreciation for how large our mission is globally.”

Navy Diver 1st Class Todd Slayden, MDSU-1, said working with other services better prepares diving units for real-world missions.

“It’s great integrating with other military, because you never know the mission at hand,” Slayden said. “We can come into some situation where you need our support, we need your support, and it teaches us how to work together and get the job done. We all go to dive school together, so all of the fundamentals are there.”

JOINT BASE PEARL HARBOR-HICKAM (July 19, 2016) U.S. Coast Guardsmen and members of the Royal New Zealand Navy observe U.S. Army Sgt. Thomas Hunnicutt, 7th Engineer Dive Detachment salvage diver, control a remotely operated vehicle, during Rim of the Pacific 2016. Twenty-six nations, more than 40 ships and submarines, more than 200 aircraft, and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 30 to Aug. 4, in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world's largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world's oceans. RIMPAC 2016 is the 25th exercise in the series that began in 1971. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Hubenthal)

Coast Guardsmen and members of the Royal New Zealand Navy observe Sgt. Thomas Hunnicutt, 7th Engineer Dive Detachment salvage diver, control a remotely operated vehicle.

Spc. Theodore Archacki, 7th Dive Det., said the experience was eye opening.

“It’s very cool to see how others operate,” Archacki said. “You look at what they use, how they operate, what they have for equipment. It’s just crazy to see that there are other ways to do things besides your own.”

During RIMPAC, Army divers were also able to work with U.S. Coast Guard, Royal New Zealand Navy, and Royal Canadian Navy while conducting dive equipment familiarization and other practical exercises.

“I hope they can take away the knowledge that they are in a very specialized, highly skilled field that spans not just the Army, but the Navy and the Coast Guard, as well, and that they are a part of a tight-knit community,” Licopoli said.

 

Twenty-six nations, more than 40 ships and submarines, more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 30 to Aug. 4, in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California.

The world’s largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world’s oceans.

RIMPAC 2016 is the 25th exercise in the series that began in 1971.

PACIFIC OCEAN (July 31, 2016) A U.S. Navy diver, Mobile Dive Salvage Unit One, jumps off of Military Sealift Command rescue and salvage ship USNS Safeguard (T-ARS-50) while supporting salvage operations during Rim of the Pacific 2016. Twenty-six nations, more than 40 ships and submarines, more than 200 aircraft, and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 30 to Aug. 4, in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world's largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world's oceans. RIMPAC 2016 is the 25th exercise in the series that began in 1971. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Hubenthal)

A Navy diver with Mobile Dive Salvage Unit One jumps off of Military Sealift Command rescue and salvage ship USNS Safeguard (T-ARS-50) while supporting salvage operations during Rim of the Pacific 2016.

 

 

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Category: Exercises, News

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