3BCT pulls out the stops in OS16 medical training

| September 30, 2016 | 0 Comments
Japan Ground Self-Defense Force medics carry a wounded comrade to safety while U.S. Army medics look on during a bilateral medical training exercise at Aibano Training Area, Japan, Sept. 12, 2016. Scenarios in the exercise allowed American and Japanese medics to share best practices for casualty treatment in a simulated high-stress combat environment. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Margaret Taylor)

JGSDF medics carry a simulated casualty to safety during a bilateral medical training exercise at Aibano Training Area, Japan, Sept. 12. Scenarios in the exercise allowed American and Japanese medics to share best practices for casualty treatment in a simulated high-stress combat environment.

 

Story and photos by Staff Sgt. Margaret Taylor
29th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment
Maryland National Guard

AIBANO TRAINING AREA, Japan — “Bilateral” took on a new meaning during the Japanese-American medical training exercise, here, Sept. 12, during Orient Shield 2016.

Orient Shield itself is a bilateral exercise, and the back-and-forth between Japanese and American medics during the multistage training exercise raised the bar.

A Japan Ground Self-Defense Force medic fills out a treatment tag for a wounded comrade while U.S. Army medics watch during a bilateral medical training exercise at Aibano Training Area, Japan, Sept. 12, 2016. Scenarios in the exercise allowed American and Japanese medics to share best practices for casualty treatment in a simulated high-stress combat environment. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Margaret Taylor)

A JGSDF medic fills out a treatment tag for a role-player wounded comrade.

After a week of planning, medical professionals from the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force and the 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Inf. Division, rolled out a complex simulation.

After taking sniper fire, medics rushed casualties to safety for medical care and then transported them to a landing zone for evacuation by helicopter. And then they did it all again.

U.S. Army Soldiers from the 2nd Infantry Division race to secure the landing zone for a Japan Ground Self-Defense Force helicopter during a bilateral medical training exercise at Aibano Training Area, Japan, Sept. 12, 2016. Scenarios in the exercise allowed American and Japanese medics to share best practices for casualty treatment in a simulated high-stress combat environment. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Margaret Taylor)

Soldiers from the 2nd Infantry Division race to secure a landing zone for a Japan Ground Self-Defense Force helicopter during a bilateral medical training exercise at Aibano Training Area, Japan, Sept. 12, 2016. Scenarios in the exercise allowed American and Japanese medics to share best practices for casualty treatment in a simulated high-stress combat environment. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Margaret Taylor)

“I get to see how other people do what I do, and not only does it make me appreciate my job more, it makes me appreciate what (the JGSDF medics) do,” said Sgt. Erica Bruckhart, a medic from the Louisiana Army National Guard and an observer during the simulation. “It just makes my job that much more special.”

Throughout the exercise, JGSDF and U.S. Army medics exchanged best practices, offered encouragement and advice, and generally lived up to what Orient Shield is all about.

Japan Ground Self-Defense Force medics carry a wounded comrade to safety while U.S. Army medics look on during a bilateral medical training exercise at Aibano Training Area, Japan, Sept. 12, 2016. Scenarios in the exercise allowed American and Japanese medics to share best practices for casualty treatment in a simulated high-stress combat environment. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Margaret Taylor)

Japanese medics carry a “wounded” comrade to safety while American medics provide escort. Scenarios in the exercise allowed American and Japanese medics to share best practices for casualty treatment in a simulated high-stress combat environment.

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