Disinterment for identification

| November 18, 2016 | 2 Comments
U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Mrissa Cuff, Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) honor guard detail member, renders a salute to the colors during a disinterment ceremony for unknown U.S. Marines from the battle at Tarawa at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, Honolulu, Hawaii, Nov. 7, 2016. The remains will be transferred to the DPAA laboratory for identification. DPAA's mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jocelyn A. Ford/DPAA)

U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Mrissa Cuff, Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) honor guard detail member, renders a salute to the colors during a disinterment ceremony for unknown U.S. Marines from the battle at Tarawa at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, Honolulu, Hawaii, Nov. 7, 2016. The remains will be transferred to the DPAA laboratory for identification. DPAA’s mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jocelyn A. Ford/DPAA)

 

Members of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) honor guard detail render salutes during a disinterment ceremony for unknown U.S. Marines from the battle at Tarawa at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, Honolulu, Hawaii, Nov. 7, 2016. The remains will be transferred to the DPAA laboratory for identification. DPAA's mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jocelyn A. Ford/DPAA)

Members of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) honor guard detail render salutes during a disinterment ceremony for unknown U.S. Marines from the battle at Tarawa at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, Honolulu, Hawaii, Nov. 7, 2016. The remains will be transferred to the DPAA laboratory for identification. DPAA’s mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jocelyn A. Ford/DPAA)

 

U.S. Army 1st Sgt. Yolanda Scipio-Jones, Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) first sergeant, renders salute during a disinterment ceremony for unknown U.S. Marines from the battle at Tarawa at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, Honolulu, Hawaii, Nov. 7, 2016. The remains will be transferred to the DPAA laboratory for identification. DPAA's mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jocelyn A. Ford/DPAA)

U.S. Army 1st Sgt. Yolanda Scipio-Jones, Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) first sergeant, renders salute during a disinterment ceremony for unknown U.S. Marines from the battle at Tarawa at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, Honolulu, Hawaii, Nov. 7, 2016. The remains will be transferred to the DPAA laboratory for identification. DPAA’s mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jocelyn A. Ford/DPAA)

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Category: Defense Media Activity, News, Stand-Alone Photo, Veterans

Comments (2)

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  1. Foundation says:

    The Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) was finally disbanded after an avalanche of outrageous scandals involving phony staged arrival home ceremonies (referred to as “The Big Lie” by JPAC employees) and multiple investigations into fraud, waste and abuse of government funds, were exposed by NBC, CBS, Fox News, NPR, the AP, and Stars and Stripes. The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Martin Dempsey, testified to Congress that the situation at JPAC was “Disgraceful”.

    A “new” Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) was created to replace the scandal plagued JPAC and the Department of Defense decided to bypass the seemingly inept JPAC/DPAA Laboratory and send cases to the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory for identifications.

    The families of over 83,000 brave American service members should know that many are working to achieve the closure that they deserve. The Chief Rick Stone and Family Charitable Foundation is proud of the small part our researchers and investigators play in providing information to “MIA” family members and others who work to resolve these cases. We look forward to assisting in many more cases until all our heroes are brought home!

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