USACE-Honolulu District responsible for design, construction, much more

| December 21, 2016 | 0 Comments
BARBERS POINT -- The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ hopper dredge Essayons just finishes vital maintenance dredging of the federal navigation channels in Honolulu, Barbers Point, Kahului, Hilo, and Nawiliwili commercial harbors. Hawaii is a maritime state over 2,400 miles from the mainland and far more dependent on its harbors than most of the United States. The Hawaii state DOT claims that over 80 percent of all consumer goods – food, clothing, autos, building supplies, machinery, paper, and allied products, medical supplies, and agricultural materials – are imported into the state. Of that 80 percent, approximately 98 percent enters Hawaii though commercial harbors on the major islands. To ensure that these vital goods continue to arrive in Hawaii, the Essayons dredged approximately 300,000 cubic yards from the harbors and safely disposed of it at EPA-designated ocean disposal sites. Special care was taken to protect marine life such as sea turtles.

BARBERS POINT — The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ hopper dredge Essayons just finishes vital maintenance dredging of the federal navigation channels in Honolulu, Barbers Point, Kahului, Hilo, and Nawiliwili commercial harbors on March 26, 2016. Hawaii is a maritime state over 2,400 miles from the mainland and far more dependent on its harbors than most of the United States. The Hawaii state DOT claims that over 80 percent of all consumer goods – food, clothing, autos, building supplies, machinery, paper, and allied products, medical supplies, and agricultural materials – are imported into the state. Of that 80 percent, approximately 98 percent enters Hawaii though commercial harbors on the major islands. To ensure that these vital goods continue to arrive in Hawaii, the Essayons dredged approximately 300,000 cubic yards from the harbors and safely disposed of it at EPA-designated ocean disposal sites. Special care was taken to protect marine life such as sea turtles.

Dino W. Buchanan
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Honolulu District Public Affairs

FORT SHAFTER — During 2016, highly motivated U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Honolulu District staff supported military construction at Hawaii Army posts and throughout the Pacific region, awarding more than 520 contract actions totaling $220,443,332, including $127.2 million for small businesses.

The District continued to work on several key Army projects, including the U.S. Army-Pacific Mission Command Facility and the renovation of historic Bldg. 112 on Palm Circle at Fort Shafter, as well as the Combat Aviation Brigade’s Phase 1 and Phase 2 projects at Wheeler Army Airfield and the Quad B renovations at Schofield Barracks.

Significant contract awards in fiscal year 2016 included the following:
•$54.8 million for the Echo Pier Restoration at U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll;
•$26 million for a Schofield Barracks Health Clinic parking structure;
•$24.1 million to repair Bldg. 155 in Quad B, Schofield Barracks;
•$22.4 million to repair Bldg. 449, Quad D, Schofield Barracks;
•$16 million for the Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, sewer repair;
•$6 million for the repair of Bldg. 556 at Schofield Barracks; and
•$3.99 million for the American Battle Monuments Commission Courts of the Missing Stone Replacement (Phase 1) at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific at Punchbowl.

WHEELER ARMY AIRFIELD — U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii (USAG-HI) Commander Col. Stephen E. Dawson (center) listens as USACE-Honolulu District engineers brief the construction layout of the Combat Aviation Brigade Phase 2 project during a site visit in October. (Photo by Dino W. Buchanan, Honolulu District Public Affairs)

WHEELER ARMY AIRFIELD — U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii (USAG-HI) Commander Col. Stephen E. Dawson (center) listens as USACE-Honolulu District engineers brief the construction layout of the Combat Aviation Brigade Phase 2 project during a site visit in October. (Photo by Dino W. Buchanan, Honolulu District Public Affairs)

Honolulu District’s Real Estate branch generated the land lease documentation for Hawaiian Electric’s new 50-megawatt bio-fuel power plant that will be constructed on approximately 8 acres of land at Schofield Barracks. The energy generated by the plant will feed into the island’s electric grid and serve all customers on Oahu.

In the event of an emergency, the plant will be able to isolate itself to Army bases, if necessary, to provide reliable power to the Army’s facilities in Central Oahu, including Schofield Barracks, Wheeler Army Airfield and Field Station Kunia.

The Schofield plant will strengthen the Oahu grid and make it better prepared for emergencies. It will be the only power plant on the island located inland, away from the coastal impacts of storms or tsunami, and will be well protected on a secure Army base.

FORT SHAFTER — The U.S. Army Pacific Mission Command Facility project, which the Corps is building for USARPAC, will consolidate USARPAC Headquarters into one facility that will support Mission Command of Army or joint forces across the Asia-Pacific Area of Operations. The District has already finished the first contract for the MCF with the successful completion of a central utilities plant, switch building, communications hub, and arrival building. The District is moving forward with the second contract that includes construction of administrative and special use spaces with supporting mechanical, electrical, and telecommunications systems.

FORT SHAFTER — The U.S. Army Pacific Mission Command Facility project, which the Corps is building for USARPAC, will consolidate USARPAC Headquarters into one facility that will support Mission Command of Army or joint forces across the Asia-Pacific Area of Operations. The District has already finished the first contract for the MCF, Aug. 10, 2016, with the successful completion of a central utilities plant, switch building, communications hub, and arrival building. The District is moving forward with the second contract that includes construction of administrative and special use spaces with supporting mechanical, electrical, and telecommunications systems.

The District also completed more than 20 outreach events for formerly used defense sites (FUDS) and regulatory programs to inform over 4,500 stakeholders and/ or members of our communities on the programs, processes and safety considerations. It also sponsored two Wounded Warrior interns, enabling them to build job skills while they transitioned from the military to civilian workforce.

Honolulu District Emergency Management teams were prepositioned several times during the 2016 hurricane season as five tropical storms/hurricanes passed Hawaii while transiting onward into the western Pacific region. The District’s emergency response teams mobilized in preparation of the arrival for the storms. The District’s Civil Works branch coordinated the maintenance dredging of five Hawaii boat harbors in April by USACE’s hopper dredge.

Throughout the year Honolulu District hosted numerous senior leader visits to District project sites, including the following:
•All of Hawaii’s congressional delegation;
•U.S. Representative for American Samoa Amua Amata Coleman Radewagen;
•Chief of Engineers Lt. Gen. Todd T. Semonite;
•Maj. Gen. Richard L. Stevens;
•USACE Deputy Chief of Engineers/Deputy Commanding General, Maj. Gen. Mark W. Yenter;
•USACE Deputy Commanding General for Military and International Operations, former USARPAC Commanding Gen. Vincent Brooks;
•The Honorable Katherine Hammack, assistant secretary of the Army for Installations and Environment;
•The Honorable Jo-Ellen Darcy, assistant secretary of the Army (Civil Works);
•Senior Executive Karen Baker, chief of the Environmental Division at USACE Headquarters;
•U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Pacific Ocean Division Commander Col. Peter Andrysiak;
•U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii Commander Col. Stephen Dawson;
•USACE-Alaska District Commander Col. Michael Brooks;
•USACE-Far East District Commander Col. Stephen Bales;
•Numerous congressional staff members; and
•Other local government officials.

The District’s Regulatory Office continued to make significant efforts in improving coordination and collaboration with interagency and interservice partners throughout the Pacific by creating and completing 32 jurisdictional determinations and issuing eight public notices.

Honolulu District is responsible for major military design and construction, civil works, international and interagency support, real estate services to the Army and Air Force, regulatory work, environmental services and emergency management.

District contract actions signify the Corps’ commitment to provide high-quality facilities to the armed forces and to protect and improve the lives of the people of Hawaii and the region.

FORT SHAFTER — Hawaii Commander Col. Stephen E. Dawson (left) looks at the roof overhang on the lanai of Bldg. 112 on Palm Circle during a familiarization site visit to the renovation project in October. (Photo by Dino W. Buchanan, Honolulu District Public Affairs)

FORT SHAFTER — Hawaii Commander Col. Stephen E. Dawson (left) looks at the roof overhang on the lanai of Bldg. 112 on Palm Circle during a familiarization site visit to the renovation project in October. (Photo by Dino W. Buchanan, Honolulu District Public Affairs)

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Category: Leadership, News, Safety, Sustainability, U.S. Army Garrison-Pohakuloa (USAG-Pohakuloa), Wounded Warriors, Year in Review

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