2nd Brigade relocates its behavioral health

| January 26, 2017 | 0 Comments
USAHC-SB, 25th ID and 2IBCT leaders – including (third from left to right) Col. Deydre Teyhen (commander, USAHC-SB), Brig. Gen. Bertram Providence (commander, Regional Health Command-Pacific), Col. Mario Diaz  (25th ID deputy commander)  and Col. Anthony Lugo ( commander, 2IBCT) – officially open the Embedded Behavioral Health office at 2IBCT. Soldiers are encouraged to drop in if for help. Mission ready, fit for duty Soldiers is a No. 1 priority.

USAHC-SB, 25th ID and 2IBCT leaders – including (third from left to right) Col. Deydre Teyhen (commander, USAHC-SB), Brig. Gen. Bertram Providence (commander, Regional Health Command-Pacific), Col. Mario Diaz (25th ID deputy commander) and Col. Anthony Lugo ( commander, 2IBCT) – officially open the Embedded Behavioral Health office at 2IBCT. Soldiers are encouraged to drop in if for help. Mission ready, fit for duty Soldiers is a No. 1 priority.

1st Lt. Jason Kilgore
U.S. Army Health Command-Schofield Barracks
Public Affairs

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — To remain at a high state of readiness is every commander’s mission.
Firing ranges are constantly being booked to log weapons qualification, and physical training is getting tougher.
Noncommissioned officers (NCOs) are constantly testing their Soldiers on tactical and technical knowledge; however, one very important aspect to readiness is being completely missed: behavioral health.
The 2nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team (2IBCT) is finding ways to provide medical service that are convenient for their Soldiers. The opening of the relocated 2IBCT Embedded Behavioral Health (EBH) office is making the commander’s mission easier to complete.
Lt. Col. Evelyn Vento, officer in charge of Behavioral Health, Schofield Barracks, stated that “by having the EBH in the brigade’s footprint, critical behavioral health services are closer in proximity to the Soldiers and leaders. This allows for improvements in mission readiness, communication, accessibility, continuity of care, and Soldier and key leader satisfaction.”
Moving the EBH into the brigade’s area provides the Soldier with a convenience that wasn’t previously available. The new location will allow Soldiers who do not possess a vehicle the ability to walk just a short distance to make their appointment.
This might not seem like much; however, when a Soldier needs to be transported in order to make an appointment, this takes away another Soldier or NCO who might be more useful completing more pertinent tasks.
Col. Anthony Lugo, commander of the 2IBCT, stated, “If proximity only allows one more Soldier to seek out behavioral health care, when they otherwise would not, then I know we have made a difference.”
There is a negative stigma about behavioral health that deems a Soldier as “weak” if they seek help. Col.  Deydre Teyhen, commander of the Health Clinic at Schofield Barracks, stated, “While deployed, behavioral health disorders account for 7.7 percent of all medically documented conditions, but that number increases to 30-35 percent of all U.S. troops seeking behavioral health care within a year after deployment.”
While that number might seem high, it could be higher if there was no negative stigma when it comes to seeking care.
“It is incumbent upon us as leaders to ensure that we get the message out across not only the Warrior Brigade, but the entire Army, that seeking behavioral health is a sign of strength,” said Lugo. “We, as Soldiers and leaders, need to take the time and look after our brothers and sisters in arms, and help them get the care they need, before it’s too late.”
The No. 1 priority of the U.S. Army Health Clinic-Schofield Barracks is providing the Army with mission ready, fit for duty Soldiers.
The USAHC-SB continually looks for ways to better serve our Soldiers and provide them with the best care.
Our Soldiers deserve nothing but the best.

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Category: Health, News

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