599th Trans. Bde. gets 25th CAB underway for Pacific Pathways

| February 2, 2017 | 0 Comments
25th CAB soldiers hold tag lines to control the movement of a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter as it is lifted into the USNS Fisher cargo hold by ship's crane during upload of CAB cargo and equipment at Pearl Harbor on Jan. 23 for Pacific Pathways 17-1.

25th CAB soldiers hold tag lines to control the movement of a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter as it is lifted into the USNS Fisher cargo hold by ship’s crane during upload of CAB cargo and equipment at Pearl Harbor on Jan. 23 for Pacific Pathways 17-1.

Story and photos by
Donna Klapakis
599th Transportation Brigade Public Affairs

PEARL HARBOR — The 599th Transportation Brigade and its partners loaded out 25th Combat Aviation Brigade cargo and equipment for Pacific Pathways 17-1 exercises, here, from Jan. 23-24.

The movement was delayed for about a week because the ship originally scheduled to conduct the move, USNS Kocak, experienced maintenance issues en route to Hawaii.

25th CAB soldiers detach the lift ropes and spreader bar after a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter is lifted into the USNS Fisher cargo hold by ship's crane during upload of CAB cargo and equipment at Pearl Harbor onJan. 23 for Pacific Pathways 17-1.

25th CAB soldiers detach the lift ropes and spreader bar after a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter is lifted into the USNS Fisher cargo hold by ship’s crane during upload of CAB cargo and equipment at Pearl Harbor onJan. 23 for Pacific Pathways 17-1.

Military Sealift Command quickly responded to activate the USNS Fisher, which was homeported in Bremerton, Washington.

The 599th’s sister unit, the 597th Transportation Bde., expeditiously trans-loaded 1-2 Stryker Brigade Combat Team equipment from the USNS Kocak to the Fisher in an effort to keep Pathways’ cargo on track.

“Despite all of the problems with a ship that broke down, late arrival, constrained timelines and ship mechanical problems, the mission was accomplished,” said Carlos Tibbetts, 599th terminal operations chief.

Partners for the move included Fleet Logistics Center, Pearl Harbor; 25th CAB; Military Sealift Command; and the 599th’s Army Material Command enterprise partners, the Logistics Resource Center’s Deployment Support Center (DSC) of the 402nd Army Field Support Bde.

“Our Army Materiel Command partners helped the unit with preparations on Schofield and Wheeler before they arrived at Pearl Harbor, such as radio frequency ID (RFID) tags, unit deployment lists (UDLs), equipment check for dimensions, hazmat (hazardous material), secondary loads and leaks,” said Tibbetts.

Jose “Raul” Ortiz is chief of deployments for the installation transportation office at DSC on Wheeler Army Airfield.

“We oversee and assist in processing all cargo leaving the island,” Ortiz said. “At deployment support, we inspect to make sure everything is in compliance with regulations and inspect for serviceability. We check that containers are properly blocked and braced and are ready for shipment. We also make sure documentation and markings are correct for hazmat.”

A truck with trailer drives onto the USNS Fisher during upload of CABcargo and equipment at Pearl Harbor on Jan. 24 for Pacific Pathways 17-1.

A truck with trailer drives onto the USNS Fisher during upload of CABcargo and equipment at Pearl Harbor on Jan. 24 for Pacific Pathways 17-1.

Before cargo arrives at Pearl Harbor, it is first thoroughly checked out at the Multifunctional Deployment Facility (MDF) at WAAF.

“During a unit move, we make sure any cargo coming down here is reduced to the lowest configuration; (we make sure it) has the correct fuel, correct height, width and axel weight,” said Melvin Wright, MDF manager. “We make sure maintenance is done and no additional hazmat is on the vehicles that isn’t supposed to be there.”

The MDF has five stations.

“The first thing that happens when rolling stock comes through the gate is, we check documentation and ensure the cargo is reduced to the lowest configuration that will be shipped,” said Wright. “The next station is fuel and defuel. We don’t defuel down here; they defuel in their motor pool, but we do have fuel if they come down without enough.

“The next station is our measuring station. There we get dimensional data and axle weight,” added Wright. “Station 4 is our JI (joint inspection) area. A maintenance crew is there to make sure there are no leaks, undocumented hazmat or short circuits.

“Station 5 is our frustrated area,” Wright continued. “If something is wrong, when mechanics do maintenance checks, we send it down to the frustrated area to get fixed. If it’s something major, they send it back to the motor pool to get it fixed or switched out for like items.”

He added, “Once everything is clear on the maintenance side of the house, they pull into the staging area and wait for military shipping labels to be placed on the equipment.”

All cargo was loaded by 3 p.m. on Jan. 24, and the ship sailed at about 5 p.m. on Jan. 26.

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