New wellness challenge focuses on ‘Triad’ goals

| February 2, 2017 | 0 Comments
Runners at the inaugural Dash to the Splash Biathlon race down Trimble Road, Saturday. Activity is one of the three aspects of the Performance Triad. The USAHC-SB is hosting a Spark Your Inner Fire challenge for six months, encouraging the community to engage in all three aspects: sleep, nutrition and activity. The Army Wellness Center is also an available resource for SYIF participants. The center offers appointments and education. (U.S. Army photo by Kristen Wong)

Runners at the inaugural Dash to the Splash Biathlon race down Trimble Road, Saturday. Activity is one of the three aspects of the Performance Triad. The USAHC-SB is hosting a Spark Your Inner Fire challenge for six months, encouraging the community to engage in all three aspects: sleep, nutrition and activity.

1st Lt. Jason Kilgore
U.S. Army Health Command-Schofield Barracks
Public Affairs
SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — The Spark Your Inner Fire (SYIF) challenge hosted by the health clinic, here, is a six-month-long challenge designed to help participants improve their quality of life by focusing on three priorities: sleep, nutrition and activity. These are the Performance Triad (P3).

By improving these three aspects, participants can expect to see improvements in their weight, energy, mentality and work performance.

“(This challenge) is designed to make it easy for people to reach their health goals,” said Col. Deydre Teyhan, commander of U.S. Army Health Clinic-Schofield Barracks. “It’s designed as an online challenge so they can build a support community online, but there are also live events, meetups in the real world, where they can get personalized health advice. It’s the balance of that virtual and real-world support that makes this challenge unique.”

An AWC educator runs a body composition analysis at the AWC.

An AWC educator runs a body composition analysis at the AWC.

Activity goals
Activity should focus on strength, endurance, balance and agility. The goal of activity is to get at least 30 minutes of strenuous activity each day. This can be in the form of weight lifting, running, or any other exercise that elevates the heart rate.

It is important that while working out, precautions are taken to prevent injuries. Every workout should begin with a decent warm up. Warm ups are a critical part of a proper workout. Warming up helps prepare the body for the physical strain that it’s about to endure. This significantly helps prevent injuries, such as pulled muscles, and improves performance during the activity.

While becoming more active is a good start, there are outside factors that can improve, or hinder, performance such as eating right. After all, you are what you eat!

Retired Col. Melanie Reeder and young female leaders from the 25th Combat Aviation Brigade share experiences at an installation dining facility, recently. Good nutrition is a priority to a new health challenge underway.

Retired Col. Melanie Reeder and young female leaders from the 25th Combat Aviation Brigade share experiences at an installation dining facility, recently. Good nutrition is a priority to a new health challenge underway.

Nutrition is vital in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Not only does nutrition provide the fuel for activity, but also helps with mentality and energy. It is one of the main contributors in reducing risks of chronic conditions, such as high blood pressure and Type 2 diabetes. Remember, food is fuel, not filler.
Sleep is usually the first to be sacrificed when one is stressed or has too much work. Sleep is critical in achieving optimal health. Lack of sleep is one of the primary causes of preventable accidents. Operating a vehicle after being awake for 17 hours is equivalent to driving with 0.05 blood alcohol content. Along with nutrition, a lack of sleep has been linked to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, depression, and it is even linked to developing Alzheimer’s disease.

Army Wellness Center health educators Glen Williams and Lily Gallagher demonstrate how to use equipment in the center's biofeedback room, which is used to limit and reduce clients' stress.

Army Wellness Center health educators Glen Williams and Lily Gallagher demonstrate how to use equipment in the center’s biofeedback room, which is used to limit and reduce clients’ stress.

Interconnected
“I don’t think a lot of people realize that these things are interconnected,” Teyhan said. “Take sleep for example. I think people misunderstand how important sleep is. They don’t realize that if they’re not getting enough sleep it could be affecting their weight. They’re awake longer, they’re eating more. There are also hormones that come into play, that are off-balanced if they’re not getting enough sleep.

“Once they see that these aspects are interconnected,” she continued, “they understand improving one can have an impact on their overall health.”
She encouraged anyone in the Army community — Soldiers, family members, civilian employees and retirees — to join.

“Nobody will be turned away and you won’t have to do it alone,” she said. “Small changes can make a huge difference (in your health).”

Army Wellness Center health educator Michele Jones, right, administers the VO2 test on health educator Josabel Archangel. VO2 testing determines a client's oxygen intake while exercising.

Army Wellness Center health educator Michele Jones, right, administers the VO2 test on health educator Josabel Archangel. VO2 testing determines a client’s oxygen intake while exercising.

AWC resource
Schofield Barracks has the available resources to help get those who want to improve their overall health moving in the right direction at the Army Wellness Center (AWC).

AWCs provide standardized primary prevention programs to promote and sustain healthy lifestyles and improve the overall well-being of active duty service members, adult family members, retirees and Department of the Army civilians by leveraging state-of-the-art techniques and equipment.

All appointments include examination of current health habits, analysis of risk factors, exploration of personal health/wellness goals, and an assessment of obstacles that may get in the way of consistent health habits.
The AWC offers sleep education, which includes general information about healthy sleep habits, impact of sleep on health and wellbeing, tools, tips and positive action steps to improve sleep.

It also offers weight management and metabolic testing. Metabolism is the medical term for the rate at which the body burns calories. Metabolic testing results provide the exact number of calories required for weight loss, gain or maintenance.

15590166_158571621287634_7632581274104451908_nThe AWC sets a baseline for the participant to see their improvement. This is done through an assessment of biometrics (height, weight, body mass index, blood pressure, heart rate) and the four components of health related physical fitness: Aerobic Fitness (VO2 Submax), body composition (percent of body fat) muscular fitness and flexibility.

Health educators use exercise test results as a planning tool for exercise prescription and motivation to assist clients in establishing and meeting reasonable physical activity, fitness and health goals.
(Editor’s Note: Staff writer Karen A. Iwamoto contributed to this story.)

More on Facebook
Join the Spark Your Inner Fire challenge by liking the Facebook page  – www.facebook.com/SparkYourInner Fire – to receive daily health tips and weekly tasks in your news feed.
For example, push yourself a little harder today. Don’t let yourself get comfortable. Try increasing the weight you are lifting by a few pounds. These are designed to allow members to encourage each other to meet their goals.
Participants earn points by completing the challenges and attending health and wellness events that take place in the real world. The participant with the most points will win a prize.
The first real-world event takes place Feb. 14 at the Schofield      Barracks AWC.

Learn More
For a complete list of resources available to support your whole health, visit U.S. Army Hawaii’s Community Resource Guide – http://bit.ly/2kHFWCg. You can browse the guide by subject or provider, or search for a specific program. You can also search for resources available at other Army installations.

Beginnings
The “Move to Health” initiative was launched by the Army’s Surgeon General in 2015 to change the way the Army community approaches its health. Army clinics still treat injuries and prescribe medication, but the emphasis is now on setting health goals and supporting patients’ physical, mental, emotional and spiritual well-being.

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Category: Health

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