2IBCT snipers get joint training with HPD

| April 6, 2017 | 0 Comments
Snipers, assigned to 2nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, conduct long-range marksmanship training with Honolulu Police Department Special Skills Division Snipers at Kualoa Ranch.

Snipers assigned to 2nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, conduct long-range marksmanship training with Honolulu Police Department Special Skills Division Snipers at Kualoa Ranch.

Story and photos by
Maj. Karen Roxberry
2nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs
25th Infantry Division

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — “People tell me I’ve saved hundreds and hundreds of people. But I have to tell you; it’s not the people you have saved that you remember. It’s the ones you couldn’t save; those are the ones you talk about. Those are the faces and situation that stay with you forever,” said military sniper Navy Seal Chris Kyle.

Time is arguably the most important aspect when Soldiers strive to hone their skills.
From March 20-24, snipers assigned to 2nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, participated in a joint training exercise alongside Hawaii and Maui Police departments, as well as Marines at Koko Head Range Complex.

Snipers from 1st Battalion, 27th Inf. Regiment, and 1st Bn., 21st Inf. Regt., 2nd IBCT, as well as snipers from 3rd Bn., 3rd Marine Regt., had an opportunity to participate in the training, which has been coined “Sniper Week.”

Cpl. Austin Frankle, a sniper assigned to 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, demonstrates camouflage techniques to Honolulu/Maui/HawaiÕi County Police Snipers at Kualoa Ranch.

Cpl. Austin Frankle, a sniper assigned to 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, demonstrates camouflage techniques to Honolulu/Maui/HawaiÕi County Police Snipers at Kualoa Ranch.

“I’ve had a chance to train with some of the best Snipers from the military, and that got me thinking of incorporating some of their tactics into our training,” said Police Officer Quentin Apilando, counter sniper for Honolulu Police Department’s Specialized Services Division. “For instance, we train a lot on precision, but we are lacking in field craft. That’s where training with the military snipers helped us a lot, by teaching us about urban stocking and urban hides, which is most of the law enforcement call out locations.”

Apilando has served with HPD for 17 years and attended the Best Sniper Competition in 2013, which was organized by 1st Bn., 21st Inf. Regt., and held at Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay.

He added that his experience at the Best Sniper Competition was amazing and was also a motivator for creating Sniper Week.

Sniper Week is designed to bring all the sniper elements in the state of Hawaii together to train and exchange tactics and ideas.

In addition to sharing knowledge across the different organizations, the training event was designed to build partnerships, which for the snipers of 2nd IBCT is important due to the Army’s small sniper community.

Snipers, assigned to 2nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, conduct long-range marksmanship training with Honolulu Police Department Special Skills Division Snipers at Kualoa Ranch.

Snipers, assigned to 2nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, conduct long-range marksmanship training with Honolulu Police Department Special Skills Division Snipers at Kualoa Ranch.

“When I was in sniper school, our instructors recommended that we train with law enforcement agencies,” said Staff Sgt. Eric Mankin, a sniper section leader for Sniper Section, 1st Bn., 21st Inf. Regt. “Since sniper community is small in the Army, it’s good to branch out and conduct training with local police departments to broaden our horizons, technically and professionally.”

“All snipers throughout the military and law enforcement do different things,” said Cpl. Austin Frankle, a sniper shooter assigned to 1st Bn., 21st Inf. Regt. “The baseline is the same, pulling the trigger and the math, but when you get all these different groups together, you learn new techniques that can be lifesaving.”

Training throughout the week consisted of a series of distance qualification exercises, training alternate firing positions, stalk exercises, movement technique classes and an aerial engagement demonstration from Hawaii and Maui snipers.

All entities that participated in the training also had an opportunity to instruct and share their knowledge base.

Snipers from 1st Bn., 27th Inf. Regt. provided instruction on camouflage, concealment and movement technique classes, and snipers from 1st Bn., 21st Inf. Regt. instructed on equipment camouflaging and packing demonstrations.

“Seeing our Marine counterparts and law enforcement counterparts operate and teach their version of similar techniques shows that there’s always room to improve or build upon tactics learned in either a schoolhouse or combat environment, said Sgt. Griffin Wilde, a sniper team leader assigned to 1st Bn., 21st Inf. Regt. “In our job, being a methodical, intelligent and a confident sniper team greatly increases the devastating effects we can make on a battlefield.”

“Sniper Week exceeded my expectations. We had the Army, Marines and various law enforcement agencies, and to see the information being exchanged from the different branches was just outstanding,” said Apilando. “I look forward to continuing my partnership with military and will continue to make ‘Sniper Week’ better every year.”

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Category: News, Training

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