3rd Brigade Combat Team conducts EIB testing

| May 11, 2017 | 0 Comments
Command Sgt. Maj. Scott A. Brzak, 25th Infantry Division, pins medal on true blue soldiers during the EIB ceremony, held on Weyand Field here, May 5.

Command Sgt. Maj. Scott A. Brzak, 25th Infantry Division, pins medal on true blue soldiers during the EIB ceremony, held on Weyand Field here, May 5.

Story and photos by Sgt. Maurice G. Gaddy
28th Public Affairs Detachment

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS, Hawaii — No matter if they’re young or old, enlisted or officer, have vast experience or are at their first duty station, during their careers most infantry Soldiers will accept the challenge and attempt to earn their Expert Infantryman’s Badge.

Sgt. Matthew Acker, a team leader, at Combat Troop, 2-14 Cavalry, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division gets in the prone with his weapon after he low crawls in move under direct fire lane during EIB testing here, May 5.

Sgt. Matthew Acker, a team leader, at Combat Troop, 2-14 Cavalry, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division gets in the prone with his weapon after he low crawls in move under direct fire lane during EIB testing here, May 5.

Soldiers of 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, held EIB testing at Schofield Barracks the first week of May. More than 600 Soldiers from the 25th ID were graded under the EIB Standards.

“EIB gives the Soldier or leader credibility,” said Sgt. Maj. Jeffery Johnson, the operations sergeant major, 3BCT, 25th ID. “When you consider there only being about 15 to 20 percent that will prove worthy enough to earn the EIB, it automatically gives them credibility when teaching, coaching and mentoring other soldiers.“

EIB training is designed and conducted under realistic conditions, and recognizes outstanding infantrymen who attain a high degree of professional skills, expertise and excellence in a broad spectrum of critical tasks.

The EIB contains 43 different tests of the infantryman’s critical skills, starting with an Army Physical Fitness Test, which they must pass with at least 75 percent in every event, and ends with a foot march. There are also weapon and medical lanes in between.

“Attention to detail is one of the most important things out here during EIB,” said Sgt. Matthew Gillis, an operations non-commissioned officer with the 3BCT, 25th ID. “EIB will usually test your ability to adapt to different situations than what you are used to, and there are more important things you need to pay attention to.”

Sgt. Edwardo Quevedo, a team leader, at Charlie Company, 2-35 Infantry Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, times a soldier as he reassembles his weapon at the 240 lane during EIB testing here, May 2. This type of training helps prepare infantryman for the rigors of decisive action missions throughout the Pacific.

Sgt. Edwardo Quevedo, a team leader, at Charlie Company, 2-35 Infantry Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, times a soldier as he reassembles his weapon at the 240 lane during EIB testing here, May 2. This type of training helps prepare infantryman for the rigors of decisive action missions throughout the Pacific.

Faced with early morning sunshine and afternoon downpours causing red Hawaiian mud to graft to their boots and clothes, the EIB candidates were determined to conquer all tasks set before them. In an environment like this, and dealing with changing weather conditions, staying motivated is an important key to success.

“With two weeks of training leading up to test week, Soldiers were tired and not motivated, so I was trying to be the one to motivate them,” said Sgt. Eduardo Quevedo, a lane instructor, 3BCT, 25th ID.

“My motivation was that all the NCOs in my platoon had EIBs so they all were pushing me to get my EIB, and in my company I was the only platoon sergeant or above that didn’t have an EIB badge so my company commander put some serious pressure on me, “ said 1st Lt. Daniel Pinho, a platoon leader, 3BCT, 25th ID.

“The Expert Infantryman’s Badge, Expert Field Medical Badge and now the Expert Action Badge will increase the readiness of the Army as a whole,” said Johnson. “Only good things result from this type of training and testing. A very good cost effective means to better prepare for our current and future mission.”

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