Equipment training improves mission readiness

| May 11, 2017 | 0 Comments
Spc. Tyler R. Aliffi (left), a signals intelligence analyst with Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment 205th Military Intelligence Battalion, 500th MI Brigade, puts together the components of the radio to be able to send up a report during a practical exercise as part of the JCR training, Schofield Barracks, May 1. The radio training prepared soldiers to be able to operate the equipment simultaneously with the JCR while in the HHMWV (High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle).

Spc. Tyler R. Aliffi (left), a signals intelligence analyst with Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment 205th Military Intelligence Battalion, 500th MI Brigade, puts together the components of the radio to be able to send up a report during a practical exercise as part of the JCR training, Schofield Barracks, May 1. The radio training prepared soldiers to be able to operate the equipment simultaneously with the JCR while in the HHMWV (High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle).

Story and photos by Sgt. Shameeka R. Stanley
500th Military Intelligence Brigade Public Affairs

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — When some Soldiers hear there is classroom training they have to attend, the first thought on most of their minds is a class consisting of PowerPoint slides for a few hours and the instructor speaking to the class the entire time.

However, on May 1, that wasn’t the case for the Soldiers of Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 205th Military Intelligence Battalion, 500th Military Intelligence Brigade.

Staff Sgt. Michael McKinley, HHD 205th MI Bn. S-6 noncommissioned officer and assistant class instructor demonstrates how to operate the Blue Force Tracker equipment inside the HHMWV. The soldiers were able to apply what theyÕve learned in the classroom during a test drive scenario in the vehicle.

Staff Sgt. Michael McKinley, HHD 205th MI Bn. S-6 noncommissioned officer and assistant class instructor demonstrates how to operate the Blue Force Tracker equipment inside the HHMWV. The soldiers were able to apply what they’ve learned in the classroom during a test drive scenario in the vehicle.

The Soldiers participated in a Joint Capabilities Release (JCR) and radio counteractive training at the brigade motor pool. The training consisted of radio counteractive operations and using the Blue Force Tracker GPS and map overlay inside a Humvee. The intent was to ensure the Soldiers have the skills, training and equipment to sustain combat situations.

The equipment the Soldiers will be training on in the Humvee is more advanced than previous systems and has the technology capabilities of a smartphone or a tablet that is more reliable and built for combat.

The training began with a realistic scenario to get the Soldiers’ attention and make it more interactive from beginning to the end. The Soldiers took turns role playing in a combat situation. Some attacked; others were forced to use the radio to report the attack.

“We wanted them to be involved in the process as much as possible, so that they can retain the knowledge they learn,” said Sgt. 1st Class Brandi C. Collins, 205th MI Bn. S-6 noncommissioned officer in charge and lead class instructor. “We didn’t want the training to be comunications specific, so we allowed the Soldiers’ peers to teach the hands-on portion of the class.”

The students started off with basic radio operations by putting the equipment together properly, ensuring they know how to make a call, sending different types of reports up, based on the situation, and how to end a call. Once the radio operation portion of the class was complete, the students then moved on to the Humvee to complete a test drive and check on their learning in action.

“I really enjoyed this training because it was hands-on, and the fact that we were able to go out in the vehicle and actually test the equipment was helpful for mission readiness,” said Spc. Tyler R. Aliffi, signals intelligence analyst, HHD, 205th MI Bn.

At the end of the training, the Soldiers had positive feedback about their experience.

“I thought the JCR training was awesome because I never encountered this piece of equipment before,” said Spc. Stephen A. Walter, a signals intelligence analyst, HHD, 205th MI Bn. “It was great to learn how we can communicate with other elements in the battlefield environment.”

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