USAG-HI recognized by Historic Hawaii Foundation

| May 11, 2017 | 0 Comments
Ken Hays, architectural historian for the Environmental Division of USAG-HI's Directorate of Public Works, stands before the Moreton Bay fig tree next to the newly restored Building 690 on Schofield Barracks. The building is one of three projects that will be recognized by the Historic Hawaii Foundation at its awards ceremony on May 19. (Photo by Karen A. Iwamoto, Oahu Publications)

Ken Hays, architectural historian for the Environmental Division of USAG-HI’s Directorate of Public Works, stands before the Moreton Bay fig tree next to the newly restored Building 690 on Schofield Barracks. The building is one of three projects that will be recognized by the Historic Hawaii Foundation at its awards ceremony on May 19. (Photo by Karen A. Iwamoto, Oahu Publications)

 Karen A. Iwamoto
Staff Writer

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — Several preservation projects undertaken by U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii and its partners will be recognized at the Historic Hawaii Foundation’s 43rd annual Preservation Awards ceremony, May 19, at the YWCA Laniakea in downtown Honolulu.

One of four interpretive panels placed around Wheeler Army Airfield makes history more accessible to the Army community. The project is being recognized by the Historic Hawaii Foundation at its award ceremony on May 19. (Courtesy photo)

One of four interpretive panels placed around Wheeler Army Airfield makes history more accessible to the Army community. The project is being recognized by the Historic Hawaii Foundation at its award ceremony on May 19. (Courtesy photo)

The rehabilitation of Building 690 on Schofield Barracks was recognized in the Preservation Award category, the roof replacement and installation of photovoltaic panels on Building 104 on Wheeler Army Airfield was recognized in the Preservation Commendation category, and the interpretive display panels on Wheeler Army Airfield were recognized in the Interpretive Media category.

“Collectively preserving these communities make it more livable and connects those of us today with the past,” said Kiersten Faulkner, executive director of Historic Hawaii Foundation. “The Army in particular is good about preserving its historic buildings. They want to continue their traditions and ensure that their Soldiers understand the significance of their history. Being able to live and work in places where history actually took place makes it real. Soldiers are living in the same buildings where history unfolded and they can see the bullet holes. That adds empathy, education and inspiration.”

Ken Hays, architectural historian with the Environmental Division of USAG-HI’s Directorate of Public Works, said it was an honor to have the projects selected as standouts in the history and preservation fields by the Historic Hawaii Foundation.

Solar panels placed atop Building 104 on Wheeler Army Airfield are hidden from street view by the building's parapets. The project is an example of how the Army is moving toward energy efficiency without compromising its historic buildings. (Courtesy photo)

Solar panels placed atop Building 104 on Wheeler Army Airfield are hidden from street view by the building’s parapets. The project is an example of how the Army is moving toward energy efficiency without compromising its historic buildings. (Courtesy photo)

“It demonstrates that the garrison is a good steward of its resources, is energy conscious and is interpreting its history for its community,” he said. “It shows that our historic resources can be a part of the Army’s resources when we adaptively reuse them.”

He said the three projects highlight different approaches to fulfilling the Army’s mission of providing a high quality of life to its Soldiers, family members and DOD civilians.

The renovation of Building 690 on Schofield Barracks demonstrates that existing structures can still serve the Army. Updates to the building include outfitting it with air-conditioning units and interior elevators, while maintaining its architectural features.

The Morton Bay fig tree that had been planted next to the building when it was built in 1929 also remains in place. Its roots had grown into the foundation of the building, but a professional arborist was called in to help cut back the roots and build a root barrier to prevent future damage to the building’s structure.

“A few people wanted to cut it down at first,” Hays said. “But now that it’s finished, I think it’s changed people’s minds. Trees matter, too. In historic preservation, landscape features come into play.”

Adding solar panels to Wheeler Army Airfield’s Building 104 during the roof repair allowed the Army to boost its renewable energy efforts without disturbing the historic features of the building.

“The parapets hide the panels, so you can’t even tell they’re there,” Hays said.

The interpretive panels make Wheeler’s history more accessible to the Army community.

“Many people know that (Wheeler) was attacked by the Japanese on Dec. 7, 1941, but not many know about other, lesser-known aspects such as that Amelia Earhart stored her planes (in one of the hangars) during one of her flights as did Sir Kingsford Smith,” Hays said. “Amazing things have happened (on Wheeler), it has a remarkable aviation history.”

The Historic Hawaii Foundation is a nonprofit organization founded in 1974. Its mission is to ensure the preservation of diverse cultural and historic places in Hawaii.

 

—INFO BOX —

 

The Projects

The information below was provided by the Historic Hawaii Foundation.

 

  • Schofield Barracks Building 690 Rehabilitation: The three-story concrete building was constructed in 1929 as a medical staff barracks facility to support the nearby health clinic at Schofield Barracks. This rehabilitation made it possible for the 88-year-old historic building to continue to serve the Army community, while preserving it as a part of the history of Schofield Barracks.

Honorees are U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii; USAG-HI’s Directorate of Public Works; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Honolulu District; Fung Associates, Inc.; Hawaiian Dredging Construction Co.; Dawson Technical, LLC; and Architects Hawai‘i.

 

 

  • Roof Replacement & Photovoltaic Panels Installation at Building 104, Wheeler Army Airfield: Rehabilitation of the historic roof and installation of photovoltaic panels on Building 104 at Wheeler Army Airfield National Historic Landmark District. The project replaced and repaired the existing roof and installed photovoltaic panels to optimize the building’s energy supply while protecting the building’s character-defining features and retaining its historic integrity. The project demonstrates and sets an example for the successful integration of sustainability and rehabilitation in keeping with preservation standards.

Honorees are USAG-HI; USAG-HI’s DPW; USAG-HI DPW’s Engineering Division; USACE-Honolulu District; Alaska Universal Services, LLC; and Coffman Engineers.

 

  • Wheeler Army Airfield Interpretive Display Panels: Development and installation of interpretive display panels at Wheeler Army Airfield. The four panels, depicting the historic aspects of Wheeler Army Airfield, are an innovative and engaging way to share the airfield’s long history with generations of post users. Panels depict the Dec. 7, 1941, attack; Garden City plan of Ebenezer Howard; Spanish Colonial Revival architecture; and its aviation history.

Honorees are USAG-HI, USAG-HI’s DPW, USACE-Honolulu District, and Kiewit Building Group.

 

 

 

 

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