HHD, 500th MI conducts MEDEVAC training using Black Hawk

| June 16, 2017 | 0 Comments
Soldiers from Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 500th MI Brigade, receive a brief training class on how to safely approach the aircraft prior to practicing loading patient on and executing hoist operations on the Jungle Penetrator during a MEDEVAC mission training exercise at Area X-ray on Schofield Barracks, June 8. Soldier safety and knowing the proper procedures to approaching an aircraft is important avoid injuries. (Photo by Sgt. Shameeka R. Stanley, 500th MI Bde. Public Affairs)

Soldiers from Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 500th MI Brigade, receive a brief training class on how to safely approach the aircraft prior to practicing loading patient on and executing hoist operations on the Jungle Penetrator during a MEDEVAC mission training exercise at Area X-ray on Schofield Barracks, June 8. Soldier safety and knowing the proper procedures to approaching an aircraft is important avoid injuries. (Photo by Sgt. Shameeka R. Stanley, 500th MI Bde. Public Affairs)

Story and photos by
Sgt. Shameeka R. Stanley
500th Military Intelligence Brigade Public Affairs

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — Soldiers from Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 500th Military Intelligence Brigade, conducted a medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) training mission, here, at Area X-Ray, June 8.

The MEDVAC training mission was taught using a Black Hawk HH-60M helicopter in conjunction with a refresher combat lifesaver course. The Soldiers were given a scenario to execute while simulating contact by enemy fire.

“Every time we do our combat lifesaver course training, we typically do it in the same location, so we wanted to do something different,” said Spc. Eric S. Yarbro, intelligence analyst, HHD 500th MI Bde. “I suggested that we include the MEDEVAC after we conducted an after action review,” he said.

Spc. Leidi Flores, a paralegal specialist, HHD 500th MI Bde, uses radiooperations to call in a 9-line MEDEVAC during a MEDEVAC training mission atArea X-ray on Scofield Barracks, June 8. Sending in a proper 9-line MEDEVACis crucial to the pick-up of the patient to be able to get emergency medicalassistance. (Photo by Sgt. Shameeka R. Stanley, 500th MI Bde. Public Affairs)

Spc. Leidi Flores, a paralegal specialist, HHD 500th MI Bde, uses radiooperations to call in a 9-line MEDEVAC during a MEDEVAC training mission atArea X-ray on Scofield Barracks, June 8. Sending in a proper 9-line MEDEVACis crucial to the pick-up of the patient to be able to get emergency medicalassistance. (Photo by Sgt. Shameeka R. Stanley, 500th MI Bde. Public Affairs)

The Soldiers were broken down into four groups of five. Each person evaluated an improvised casualty, using a mannequin, by checking for blood and treating any open wounds with a field dressing or applying a tourniquet for broken limbs to control bleeding and prevent shock.

“I love this type because it’s more realistic,” said Yarbro. “I knew it would be a lot of work with putting this training together, but I was able to receive a lot of help doing it.”

After treating the casualty wound, the Soldiers then loaded the casualty onto the litter or stretcher. One Soldier would call in a 9-line MEDEVAC request using a radio. Once the aircraft arrived, the casualty was lifted onto the aircraft.

Spc. Leidi JorquezFlores, a paralegal specialist, HHD 500th MI Bde, uses radio operations to call in a 9-line MEDEVAC. Sending in a proper 9-line MEDEVAC is crucial to the pick-up of the patient to be able to get emergency medical assistance. (Photo by Sgt. Shameeka R. Stanley, 500th MI Bde. Public Affairs)

Spc. Leidi JorquezFlores, a paralegal specialist, HHD 500th MI Bde, uses radio operations to call in a 9-line MEDEVAC. Sending in a proper 9-line MEDEVAC is crucial to the pick-up of the patient to be able to get emergency medical assistance. (Photo by Sgt. Shameeka R. Stanley, 500th MI Bde. Public Affairs)

“It feels good knowing that another specialist, like myself, helped put this training together that included a Black Hawk,” said Spc. Ralf Pizzaro, an information technology specialist, HHD 500th MI Bde. “It inspires me to want to do great things in the Army, regardless of my rank,” he said.

In a combat environment, Soldiers may find themselves in some areas where it may be difficult or unsafe for an aircraft to land, such as near low hanging wires, terrain or weather. Therefore, the aircraft is equipped with a jungle penetrator. It is used to hoist a patient from confined places and into the aircraft.

“This is the closest thing to a real-world experience,” said Pizzaro. “Everything that could happen on the battlefield, we were able to do,” he said. “Train while you fight!”

 

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Category: Exercises, News, Training

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