Safety adviser touts opportunities in Army career field

| August 3, 2017 | 0 Comments
From left are Donald Pagliani, region safety manager for Installation Command-Pacific; Tamara Nazario, deputy to the functional chief representative for CP-12; Dr. Brenda Miller, functional chief representative for CP-12; and Michael Schwarz, U.S. Army Pacific safety director.

From left are Donald Pagliani, region safety manager for Installation Command-Pacific; Tamara Nazario, deputy to the functional chief representative for CP-12; Dr. Brenda Miller, functional chief representative for CP-12; and Michael Schwarz, U.S. Army Pacific safety director. (Photo by Karen A. Iwamoto, Oahu Publications)

Story and photo by
Karen A. Iwamoto

Staff Writer

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — Dr. Brenda Miller is the senior safety adviser to the Army’s director of Safety and the functional chief representative for the Army’s Career Program 12, which oversees the safety and occupational hazard career field.

The CP-12 includes thousands of Department of the Army employees across the globe, from firefighters and emergency management workers to engineers and range control specialists.

Miller was in Hawaii from July 28-31 to conduct a series of workshops on career and professional development opportunities within the CP-12 field. While here, she took a few minutes to answer some questions from the Hawaii Army Weekly.

HAW: Who are the CP-12 careerists?

Miller: The preponderance of the careerists fall into a handful of job series. The majority are firefighters, emergency management, safety engineers, industrial hygenists and health physicists. But we also have wage-grade employees. We have local, international employees, a lot of those in overseas commands, so we’re not just civil service employees. It’s anyone who is a federal employee of the Army, who is being paid by the Army and not in a contract position. It covers a wide span of folks.

HAW: How is the CP-12 structured?

Miller: The way (the Army) went about structuring its career programs is it looked at the preponderance of duties in a professional description, and where they were like job characteristics, they brought those job series together. So if you look at all the jobs series in CP-12, you’ll see we have some commonality.

Risk mitigation and readiness are the first that come to mind. All of us, whether a firefighter, EMT, safety specialist … we’re all focused on risk mitigation, advising a commander so he or she can make good safety decisions and enhance readiness.

HAW: What are some of the challenges facing those in the CP-12 field?

Miller: Having to do less with more is certainly a challenge. Another challenge is keeping commanders informed to make sure they know the value-added of having a professional safety worker to give them the right advice to make the right decision when it comes to a safety and risk management situation.

There’s a lot of turnover in the commands. Also, we have a lot of one-person safety offices and that can be a challenge, especially because we don’t want to get to the point where we’re putting Soldiers at risk.

HAW: What are you doing to address those challenges?

Miller: The first thing is to have the command, when they are hiring or recruiting, recruit qualified safety and occupational professionals. That is absolutely critical as we indicated. In some cases, we have one-person safety offices. The second thing is to make sure all commands and (CP-12) careerists are aware of the opportunities we provide for them. We palm for money to support them in terms of money and education. We provide the credentialing programs at no cost, so we want the commands to know that.

HAW: What are some of the strengths of the CP-12?

Miller: The fact that we have a career program that provides a champion for careerists in the field is a strength. We have funding to support their professional development requirements and training needs.

I think that about 90 percent or more of safety and occupational health professionals across the Army have professional credentials, so a commander is getting a skilled occupational professional to advise him or her; I think that’s a strength.

HAW: How can folks find out more about opportunities in CP-12?

Miller: We have a website and we also post all of our jobs to usajobs.gov, so anybody who’s interested in applying for an entry-level position or a more senior position, those are posted there.

The other thing we are doing now is reaching out to colleges and universities, so we have a pipeline to different sources, so everything from a Soldier getting out of the military who may be interested to a retiree that may be interested because there are some positions where we need someone who was a prior military.

 

More Details

For more information on the Army’s CP-12, visit https://safety.army.mil/CP-12.aspx.

Tags: , ,

Category: News, Safety

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *