Women and Equality; The journey continues

| September 13, 2017 | 1 Comment

(Left to right) Panel members Sherri Lee, 500th Military Intelligence Brigade-Theater (MIB-T) administrative officer, Col. Danielle Ngo, 130th Engineer Brigade Commander, U.S. Rep. Colleen Hanabusa, Hawaii’s 1st Congressional District, Command Sgt. Maj. Tammy M. Everette, senior enlisted advisor, 500th MIB-T, Col. Deydre Teyhen, Schofield Barracks Health Clinic commander, Rev. Dr. Alaine Thomson Buchanan, and Angelita Dizon, Installation Voting Assistant Officer spoke at the Women’s Equality Day luncheon held at the K-Quad dining facility on Schofield Barracks, Hawaii Aug. 25, 2017. (Photo by Sgt. Shameeka R. Stanley, 500th Military Intelligence Brigade Public Affairs)

Story and photos by
Sgt. Shameeka R. Stanley
500th Military Intelligence Brigade Public Affairs

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — It has been over 90 years since the 19th Amendment was passed in 1920. Yet, the journey of equality continues to expand outside of women’s right to vote. The brave women of yesterday, like Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, who were suffragist during the women’s rights movement in the 1800s, have set the path and led the way for the women of today.

Nearly 300 Soldiers, family members and civilians came together for a ceremony to celebrate Women’s Equality Day, which commemorate the passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, granting the right to vote to women.

Women’s Equality Day is an annual observance, celebrated nationally, which is officially designated Aug. 26 of each year.

The 500th Military Intelligence Brigade-Theater (MIB-T) hosted the Women’s Equality Day observance at the Sgt. Smith Theater on Aug. 25, 2017, here.

“Today, we celebrate not only Aug. 26 as equality day, we also celebrate Mar. 8, International Women’s Day, and Apr. 4, as Equal Pay Day,” said U.S. Rep. Colleen Hanabusa, of Hawaii’s 1st Congressional District.

Hanabusa was the keynote speaker for the event. She began her remarks by emphasizing the importance of Women’s Equality Day and the transformation of women’s equality over the past years.

U.S. Rep. Colleen Hanabusa, of Hawaii’s 1st Congressional District, gives a keynote speech during the Women’s Equality Day Observance at the Sgt. Smith Theater on Schofield Barracks, Aug. 25, 2017. Women’s Equality Day is a national observance celebrated to commemorate the passing of the 19th Amendment, which granted women the right to vote. (Photo by Sgt. Shameeka R. Stanley, 500th Military Intelligence Brigade Public Affairs)

“Women have to work twice as hard and prove to everyone that they are equal and then prove their worth,” she said.

Hanabusa looked out into the audience to ask, “Are we getting better?” She replied, “We’re better than where we were in 1999.”

Today, women’s equality has tremendously evolved into more than a women’s right to vote. Barriers have been broken and doors have been opened in industries and positions that were once unprecedented for women.

In 2016, the Army opened military occupational specialties (MOS) that were once not an option for women, such as infantry, filed artillery, and special forces.

“When those jobs opened up for women, I was very proud,” said Command Sgt. Maj. Tammy M. Everette, senior enlisted advisor, 500th MIB-T. “I was not only proud as a woman but, as a Soldier, I was very proud to be a part of the Army,” she said. “My thing has always been, if you have the ability to do it, then you should be able to have the opportunity,” said Everette.

Women of today continue to strive forward and exceed expectations beyond what many could have ever imagined, whether it is through the civilian workforce, military, sports, entertainment, and entrepreneurship.

Women’s Equality Day give people the opportunity to celebrate the remarkable progress that has been made for nearly a century and honor the contributions that women throughout history have made.

“What I understand from being in the Army is that we are a team sport, so as a team sport, it’s about blending all of the right capabilities together so that we have the ability to win our nations war,” said Col. Deydre Teyhen, Schofield Barracks Health Clinic commander. “Once we are equal and we have equality as a shared standard, we do better as a nation, we do better as companies, organizations, teams and families.”

Soldiers, civilians and family members gathered together to celebrate Women’s Equality Day observance at Sgt. Smith Theater on Schofield Barracks, Aug. 25, 2017. Women’s Equality Day is a national observance celebrated to commemorate the passing of the 19th Amendment, which granted women the right to vote. (Photo by Sgt. Shameeka R. Stanley, 500th Military Intelligence Brigade Public Affairs)

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  1. James K C says:

    We’re STILL(?!) talking about this stuff??

    The Free World needs to get off the track of always pointing to differences in OUTCOME as an excuse for more programs, initiatives, and distractions, and remember that EQUALITY OF OPPORTUNITY has already been achieved, realized, and is put into practice. Equality of Opportunity is good enough. Done. Move on.
    So long as anyone desires to look at equality of outcome, there will always be “something” (some “group”) that is still aggrieved.
    Yawn…

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