25th CAB gets new lighting in old hangars

| January 11, 2018 | 0 Comments
B Troop, 2nd Squadron, 6th Cavalry Regiment, 25th Combt Aviation Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, can fullly see its AH-64 helicopter in Hangar 112 at Wheeler after new LED lighting is installed. (Photo by Casey Hiraiwa, Directorate of Public Works, U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii energy manager)

B Troop, 2nd Squadron, 6th Cavalry Regiment, 25th Combat Aviation Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, can fullly see its AH-64 helicopter in Hangar 112 at Wheeler after new LED lighting is installed. (Photo by Casey Hiraiwa, Directorate of Public Works, U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii Energy Manager)

Santiago Hernandez
Energy Conservation Manager
Directorate of Public Works
U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii  

WHEELER ARMY AIRFIELD — Christmas came early for 25th Combat Aviation Brigade, 25th Infantry Division Soldiers working in Hangar 112, here.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and the Directorate of Public Works (DPW) were implementing an Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) throughout U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii sites. The team worked closely with the installing contractor to complete the hangar light-emitting diode (LED) lighting upgrade project ahead of schedule. The installation provides better support for CAB training and future missions.

DPW estimated the contractual savings for the hangar to have been $26,000 per year, improving overall lighting, increasing operational capacity and reducing maintenance costs.

“An Energy Savings Performance Contract is a contracting vehicle that allows agencies to accomplish energy savings projects for their facilities without up-front capital costs and without special Congressional appropriations to pay for the improvements,” according to the Huntsville U.S. Army Engineering and Support Center. “In ESPC, contractors provide their own funding for projects and are paid back from savings resulting from the contractor’s actions.”

B Troop, 2nd Squadron, 6th Cavalry Regiment, 25th Combat Aviation Brigade, 25th Infantry Division Soldiers work on an AH-64 helicopter in Hangar 112 at Wheeler after new LED lighting is installed. (Photo by Casey Hiraiwa, Directorate of Public Works, U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii energy manager)

Soldiers in B Troop, 2nd Squadron, 6th Cavalry Regiment, 25th Combat Aviation Brigade, 25th Infantry Division work on an AH-64 helicopter in Hangar 112 at Wheeler after new LED lighting is installed. (Photo by Casey Hiraiwa, Directorate of Public Works, U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii Energy Manager)

The installation of energy conservation measures started January 2017 and will continue until July 2018. The work will include the installation of building automation components and systems at 15 buildings, HVAC improvements in three Soldier barracks, retrofit of over 36,000 lights in 88 buildings, new weather-stripping and door sweeps in 27 buildings, solar hot water systems for 16 buildings, low-flow plumbing fixtures in 15 buildings, and the installation of 124 energy efficient transformers across 39 buildings.

Overall, it is estimated that the implementation of these energy conservation measures will save USAG-HI over $3 million in annual energy costs and help reduce carbon emissions over the next 23 years. Additionally, DPW will receive training, maintenance and repair support from the contractor on select components, thus reducing DPW’s workload and allowing it the opportunity to focus on other much-needed public work projects.

CAB Soldiers working in Hangar 112 greatly appreciate the new lighting upgrade.

“Our previous lighting system wasn’t the best,” said Spc. Juan Nieves, an AH-64 Apache helicopter mechanic in B Troop, 2nd Squadron, 6th Cavalry Regiment, 25th CAB. “It was hard to work in the hangar at nighttime; however, now we have the advantage of working 24-hour shifts under safer conditions. During our night-shift, it almost seems as if we are working during daylight hours,” the two-year veteran said.

The ESPC project is an important element in helping USAG-HI reduce water and energy consumption; however, it will not work by itself. Sensors will eventually malfunction, weather-stripping will undoubtedly deteriorate and low-flow water fixtures do no good if left unnecessarily on. Therefore, if something is broken, personnel must call it in.

 

• Point of Contact

A strong energy conservation program starts with everyone assuming conservation responsibility; it is the right thing to do. If you need to use it, do so, but if not, shut it off.

Soldiers and civilians are encouraged to call in DPW service orders at (808) 656-1275.

Email your request to usarmy.wheeler.id-pacific.list.dpw-demand-maintenance-orders@mail.mil.

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