Drunk driving is an avoidable offense

| January 11, 2018 | 0 Comments

Police Call

Staff Sgt. Fabian De Jesus Jr.
Law Enforcement Division
Directorate of Emergency Services
U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii

WHEELER ARMY AIRFIELD — Drive hammered; get slammered!

If you are planning to watch the exciting end to this 2017-2018 NFL season, or go out and have a couple of drinks with some friends, it is very important to have a designated driver. Not only can drinking and driving greatly affect your life, but it puts others in the vehicle and drivers on the roads lives in jeopardy.

Driving under the influence not only leads to great legal consequences, but can also affect an innocent driver on the road. Before you risk your own life, please think about the other people that you can be putting in danger.

The Drunk Driving Prevention Program provides free rides to those who call the program or use their app if they are too impaired to drive. Volunteers will ensure both drivers and their cars are driven home safely.

The Drunk Driving Prevention Program provides free rides to those who call the program or use their app if they are too impaired to drive. Volunteers will ensure both drivers and their cars are driven home safely. (Courtesy photo)

Drinking irresponsibly can cause your entire life to come to a screeching halt. There are plenty of contingencies that can be put in place, but let’s first discuss the Hawaii Revised Statutes.

A statute states that a person commits the offense of operating a vehicle under the influence of an intoxicant, or OVUII, if the person operates or assumes actual physical control of a vehicle with a .08 or more grams of alcohol of breath or with .08 or more grams of alcohol of blood.

Besides the consequences of a first offense, you can hurt yourself and/or someone else. This could be detrimental to you and your family by taking your time and money as well as revoking your driver’s license for 365 days or more.

The horrors of operating a vehicle under the influence of an intoxicant could be avoided in so many ways. The Army embeds in our minds that we should always have a plan, have a battle buddy with you when you go out and trust in your leadership. If all else fails, the Directorate of Emergency Services wants to take the time to talk about the Drunk Driving Prevention Program, or DDPP, which can ultimately save you, your families and other people’s lives.

This program includes a nonprofit organization run by Soldiers who volunteer their Fridays and Saturdays to come pick you up if you are too intoxicated.

How do I qualify for the DDPP?

The DDPP is available to DOD ID cardholders over the age of 21 every Friday and Saturday night from 8 p.m. until 6 a.m.

Is there anything more?

If a DOD ID cardholder is out with friends who are civilians, they may ride as passengers. For more details, visit the DDPP website at http://www.ddpp.us.

Other resources you can use to get a ride back home safely are Uber, Lyft or a local cab.

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In other news, in comparison to fiscal year 2016, fiscal year 2017 saw a 35 percent increase in OVUII offenses. About 68 percent of OVUIIs are committed off the installation, with the average offender age between 21 to 25.

As a prevention measure, it is stressed for Soldiers to feel empowered to intervene and take action to protect their battle buddies if they see a fellow Soldier at risk of making poor decisions due to alcohol.

(Editor’s note: De Jesus Jr. is the Operations NCO in the Law Enforcement Division.)  

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Category: Police Call, Safety, Standing Columns

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