25th Sustainment Brigade conducts Reverse Warfighter exercise to forecast logistics

| April 10, 2018 | 0 Comments
SCHOFIELD BARRACKS, Hawaii – Staff Sgt. Curtis Whitworth, the noncommissioned officer in charge of the security and intelligence section of the 25th Sustainment Brigade, reviews one of his NCO’s work March 27, during the brigade’s Reverse War Fighter Exercise (RWFX). The week-long RWFX was designed to test the realistic capabilities of the 25th Sustainment Brigade’s ability to provide sustainment to unit’s they support in an austere environment. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ian Ives, 25th Sustainment Brigade Public Affairs, 25th Infantry Division)

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS, Hawaii – Staff Sgt. Curtis Whitworth, the noncommissioned officer in charge of the security and intelligence section of the 25th Sustainment Brigade, reviews one of his NCO’s work March 27, during the brigade’s Reverse War Fighter Exercise (RWFX). The week-long RWFX was designed to test the realistic capabilities of the 25th Sustainment Brigade’s ability to provide sustainment to unit’s they support in an austere environment. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ian Ives, 25th Sustainment Brigade Public Affairs, 25th Infantry Division)

Sgt. 1st Class Heather A. Denby
25th Sustainment Brigade Public Affairs
25th Infantry Division

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — Given the nature of typical Army training exercises, which are mostly combat arms focused, it is often difficult to truly assess and forecast realistic logistics requirements for the modern combat environment.

This is because the sustainment aspect of the fight, though not overlooked or disregarded, is often placed at a lower priority at certain points in order to allow the maneuver fight to continue.

Soldiers of the 25th Sustainment Brigade conducted a weeklong “Reverse Warfighter” exercise, March 23-29, at the Mission Training Center-Hawaii to address this issue.

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS, Hawaii - Maj. Michael Huber, a transportation officer with the 593th Expeditionary Sustainment Command, advises Soldiers from the 25th Sustainment Brigade March 27, during their Reverse War Fighter Exercise. The week-long RWFX was designed to test the realistic capabilities of the 25th Sustainment Brigade's ability to provide sustainment to unit's they support in an austere environment. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ian Ives, 25th Sustainment Brigade Public Affairs

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS, Hawaii — Maj. Michael Huber, a transportation officer with the 593th Expeditionary Sustainment Command, advises Soldiers from the 25th Sustainment Brigade, March 27, during their Reverse War Fighter Exercise. The weeklong RWFX was designed to test the realistic capabilities of the 25th Sustainment Brigade’s ability to provide sustainment to units they support in an austere environment. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ian Ives, 25th Sustainment Brigade Public Affairs

For the RWFX, maneuver elements conducted the fight in a way that would allow the brigade to “train to failure in order to validate the core essential tasks that it takes to support maneuver unit,” said Lt. Col. Stephanie Simmons, 25th Sust. Bde. support operations officer in charge.

The brigade utilized subject matter experts from the Department of Logistics and Resource Operations, Logistics Exercise and Simulation Directorate systems and a series of specifically crafted scenarios to simulate the 25th Infantry Division’s involvement in a war effort during a digital exercise.

Logistic requirements across the Division were stressed to near breaking points at various times during the exercise to test the capabilities of the 25th Sust. Bde. staff and SPO.

The sections had to work through various logistics considerations, such as planning convoys over rough terrain, utilizing limited road networks and coordinating with other units in the simulation in order to complete the mission. By working through the scenarios, Soldiers were able to synchronize and discuss their tactics, techniques and procedures throughout the sustainment chain.

“The outcome of this exercise was invaluable,” said Maj. Kevin Hoffman, 25th Sust. Bde. operations officer in charge. “We were able to validate our current operational guidance and provide critical feedback to maneuver elements, as well as to the Combined Arms Support Command, which was a major objective for us while we were out here.”

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS, Hawaii – A Soldier with the 25th Sustainment Brigade works on a providing an accurate logistics report March 27, during the brigade’s Reverse War Fighter Exercise. The week-long RWFX was designed to test the realistic capabilities of the 25th Sustainment Brigade’s ability to provide sustainment to unit’s they support in an austere environment. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ian Ives, 25th Sustainment Brigade Public Affairs, 25th Infantry Division)

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS, Hawaii – A Soldier with the 25th Sustainment Brigade works on a providing an accurate logistics report March 27, during the brigade’s Reverse War Fighter Exercise. The week-long RWFX was designed to test the realistic capabilities of the 25th Sustainment Brigade’s ability to provide sustainment to unit’s they support in an austere environment. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ian Ives, 25th Sustainment Brigade Public Affairs, 25th Infantry Division)

Another major training objective was to work with external agents at levels above and below the Sustainment Brigade in order to ensure that brigade products and standard operating procedures are reflective of their higher commands. Personnel from the 25th ID, 593rd Expeditionary Sustainment Command, and 8th Theater Sustainment Command played key roles in providing guidance and support in order to achieve the desired intent.

“The exercise was a great opportunity for sustainers across multiple echelons to work together, face-to-face and collaborate on complex logistics challenges,” said Maj. Michael Huber, 593rd ESC transportation officer. “It enabled everyone to lay the foundation for synchronized and standardized reporting procedures across the tactical operational levels of sustainment.”

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